Gender

The Gender Programme was established to ensure that NACA implements the action plans on gender mainstreaming within its activities. With a continued interest in embracing gender integration among relevant agencies, NACA aims to build up capacity of members in gender mainstreaming in all its undertakings, and motivate support and action globally.

Insufficient capacity for gender research and application among stakeholders is a hindrance to effectively implement programs integrating the gender dimensions in development. Adding a gender dimension in aquaculture value chains will give assurance to consumers that seafood has been produced sustainably.

Key activities

Key activities of the programme are:

  • Women, Youth and Aquaculture Development Programme.
  • Organising and supporting symposia on Gender in Aquaculture and Fisheries.
  • Capacity building on gender integration and mainstreaming.
  • Curriculum development on gender in aquaculture and fisheries education.
  • In-country gender assessment reports for policy, action and research.
  • Publication of case studies and success stories on gender in aquaculture value chains.
  • Coordinating the Regional Gender Practitioners’ Network and mentoring programmes.
  • Campaigns and policy advocacy for gender integration in aquaculture.

Related

Subject tags

A collection of subject tags relating to technical matters.

In this collection

Aquaculture Asia Magazine, July-September 2017

In this issue:

Regional network on culture-based fisheries and stock enhancement; trout fisheries in the uplands of Arunachal Pradesh - resources and opportunities; empowering young Indian women through entrepreneurship development - opportunities and constraints; a view on murrel (snakehead) fisheries in India; hybrid catfish Clarias batrachus x Heteropneustes fossilis produced by farmers in West Bengal, India; Backyard fish based pig farming using low-cost feed in Arunachal Pradesh - a success story; NACA Newsletter.

Empowering young Indian women through entrepreneurship development: Opportunities and constraints

Women’s entrepreneurship can be a boon for sustainable utilisation of resources, food security and employment generation. Women entrepreneurship can be defined as the process, in which she thinks to set up a business, gathering all the resources necessary to manage a business venture, provide employment to others and to make a profit along the way while minimising risk while initiating, organising and running a business enterprise.

Job opportunity - gender and social development specialist

The SEAFDEC-Sweden project is seeking a Gender and Social Development Specialist with a knowledge and passion for gender equality, human rights and social development. As a Gender and Social Development Specialist, you shall have deeper understanding of gender, human rights and social development aspects helping SEAFDEC-Sweden project, its implementing partners and project staff on how to promote gender equality, human rights and social development through internal practice and gender analysis.

Aquaculture Asia Magazine, April-June 2017

In this issue:

Inspiring story of aquaculture in Sikkim - a journey from conservation to farming; farming of scampi and tiger shrimp together - a case study from West Bengal; Labeo pangusia - a candidate for diversification of hill aquaculture; sustainability of an integrated livestock-fish-crop farming system as a small scale enterprise; sustainable coastal aquaculture in India; potential scope and prospects of domestic fish market in Chhattisgarh.

Potential scope and prospects of domestic fish market in Kawardha District, Chhattisgarh, India

Trade in fisheries products is an important source of livelihoods for economically underprivileged people in Chhattisgarh. A socio-economic profile of traders and other actors from a domestic fish market is presented, including age, gender, education and income levels. The market infrastructure, distribution channels and species traded are described. Constraints to marketing arrangements are identified and include a lack of cold chain, storage and transport facilities.

Aquaculture Asia Magazine, January-March 2017

In this issue:

Anti-microbial resistance in aquaculture; participatory market chain approaches to boost fish nurseries; traditional community fishing practices of rural Assam; practical significance of restricted feeding regimes in aquaculture; Bangana dero: A potential indigenous fish species for diversification of carp culture; shell colour variation in farmed Litopenaeus vannamei: Comparison of white- and brown-shelled shrimp; culture-based fisheries: A low-tech, greenhouse friendly approach to improving food and income for Cambodian families.

Giant Prawn 2017

The fourth major international event on giant freshwater prawns was organised by the Asian Institute of Technology from 20-24 March 2007. The conference, organised by Salin Krishna and Michael New, built on a series of highly successful events that trace back to the very beginnings of the industry. The first conference, Giant Prawn 1980 brought together all those involved in freshwater prawn research and farming for the first time and set many priorities for future research and development.

Traditional community fishing practices of rural Kamrup of Assam

Community fishing is a unique feature in the state of Assam, India. The present case study narrates a community fishing event in the floodplain wetlands (beels) of Kamrup District in Assam, India, witnessing participation of different tribal communities in fishing and the modus operandi of diverse types of fishing gears with catch details. The design details of the gear were documented. The communal fishing practices of local communities are described along with the respective roles of men and women.

Participatory market chain approach: An unidentified sustainable supply chain model to boost fish nurseries

In Nepal, low quality and seasonal access to fish seed is an important restriction on the development of the aquaculture sector. Commercialisation of fish farming cannot progress rapidly in the absence of critical inputs and a regular supply of quality fish seed is an integral requirement for the transition of fish farming from a subsistence activity to a commercial enterprise. Participatory market chain approaches are a key tool for the social and economic improvement of farmers and market participants.

The AFSPAN Project was a three-year initiative to improve our understanding of the role of aquaculture in food security, poverty alleviation and human nutrition. The project developed new methodologies to quantify the impact of aquaculture in developing nations and low income food deficit countries. The findings will contribute to more efficient planning, coordination and implementation of research and development programmes increasing aquaculture impact on food security, livelihoods and poverty alleviation for the poor.