This book is the proceedings of the “Regional Consultation on Culture-Based Fisheries Development in Asia”, held in Siem Reap, Cambodia, 21-23rd of October 2014, under the auspices of the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR), the Mekong River Commission (MRC) and the Network of Aquaculture Centres in Asia-Pacific (NACA). The consultation was jointly organised by NACA and the Fisheries Administration of the Royal Government of Cambodia.

The twelfth meeting of NACA’s Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) was held in the coastal town of Cha-am, Thailand from 9-12 March. The TAC meets every two years to review NACA’s rolling work programme and propose amendments to realign it with the current needs of member governments and to account for new and emerging issues. In proposing changes, the TAC prioritises issues of common concern to member governments where there are prospects for regional collaboration.

Many attempts to extend small-scale inland aquaculture have been made so far in many parts of Asia and some parts of Africa. According to lessons learnt from these experiences, stable seed production is the most decisive factor to develop freshwater fish farming in poor rural areas. Seed production technology, with ensuring the supply of good quality brood stock, should firmly be built. Seed production will be highly commercialised, contributing to a growth of local economy.

NACA was selected by the World Bank to implement a 6 day training program on "Good Aquaculture Practices" in Surabaya, Indonesia from 17-22 June 2013 under the on-going World Bank Global Food Safety Partnership initiative. The objective of this training was to deliver a certificate level food safety and supply chain management training program on design and implementation of good aquaculture practices through the supply chain including food safety management systems and HACCP.

In this issue:

A second trip to Hubei Province, central China. Sea cage growout of cobia Rachycentron canadum in the Gulf of Mannar. Culture of small indigenous fish species in polyculture with Indian major carps and high value crops along pond dykes. Study on sperm chilled storage of common carp Cyprinus carpio in Vietnam. Culture-based fisheries exchanges between Lao PDR and Cambodia. Culprit behind massive shrimp die-offs in Asia unmasked.

In this issue:

Call for applications (2nd round): FK Norway South-South Aquaculture Professional Exchange Programme. AFSPAN field surveys underway! 4th Global Symposium on Gender in Aquaculture and Fisheries. An anti-viral treatment for healthier black tiger prawns. Jungle perch on the comeback trail. Nursery management of grouper: A best-practice manual (Indonesian translation). Hatchery management of tiger grouper (Epinephelus fuscoguttatus): A best-practice manual (Indonesian translation). Priority adaptations to climate change for Pacific fisheries and aquaculture: Reducing risks and capitalising on opportunities. Improving biosecurity through prudent and responsible use of veterinary medicines in aquatic food production.

To provide food to the world’s population in 2050, it has been estimated that agricultural output, primarily from crops, livestock and fisheries, including aquaculture, must increase by 60 percent. Intensification of aquaculture is inevitable in the face of increasing demand, limited land areas, and improved technology. Whether we are able to accomplish this in a sustainable manner will depend on global governance and stewardship as much as on technological progress.

In this issue:

Outcomes of emergency consultation on shrimp early mortality syndrome / AHPNS. Workshop on Aquaculture Planning and Management Tools. Workshop on Proficiency Testing Programme for Aquatic Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratories in Asia-Pacific. AFSPAN Project gets underway.

The Global Conference on Aquaculture 2010 reviewed the present status and trends in aquaculture development, addressed emerging issues relevant to aquaculture development, assessed opportunities and challenges for future aquaculture development and built consensus on advancing aquaculture as a global, sustainable and competitive food production sector. This volume provides information on how aquaculture could be mobilized to alleviate global poverty and improve food and nutrition security in the coming decades.

This manual is intended for the use by the current and prospective small-scale farmer groups who are interested in obtaining accreditation for their production process. The objective is to provide them an easy-to-follow, stepwise guide that can be used as a practical tool in their venture of attaining group certification. However, this can be used by the field extension officers and certifiers who are directly involved in the process or other interested parties.