Gender

The Gender Programme was established to ensure that NACA implements the action plans on gender mainstreaming within its activities. With a continued interest in embracing gender integration among relevant agencies, NACA aims to build up capacity of members in gender mainstreaming in all its undertakings, and motivate support and action globally.

Insufficient capacity for gender research and application among stakeholders is a hindrance to effectively implement programs integrating the gender dimensions in development. Adding a gender dimension in aquaculture value chains will give assurance to consumers that seafood has been produced sustainably.

Key activities

Key activities of the programme are:

  • Women, Youth and Aquaculture Development Programme.
  • Organising and supporting symposia on Gender in Aquaculture and Fisheries.
  • Capacity building on gender integration and mainstreaming.
  • Curriculum development on gender in aquaculture and fisheries education.
  • In-country gender assessment reports for policy, action and research.
  • Publication of case studies and success stories on gender in aquaculture value chains.
  • Coordinating the Regional Gender Practitioners’ Network and mentoring programmes.
  • Campaigns and policy advocacy for gender integration in aquaculture.

Related

Subject tags

A collection of subject tags relating to technical matters.

In this collection

A livelihoods study of farmers and fishers in Dang Tong Village, Kampong Chhnang Province, Cambodia

This is the report of a livelihoods study team working together with villagers from Dang Tong Village in Kampong Chhnang Province, Cambodia. In general, villagers are skilled in farming and mat weaving, but some villagers also have individual skills such as carpentry, boat making, hairdressing and fixing machines. Although this village is in the Tonle Sap (Great Lake) area, which has the most plentiful supply of fresh fish in the country, the villagers are subsistence fishers.

Report on sustainable livelihoods study of farmers and fishers in Koh Reusey Village, Kampong Chhnang Province, Cambodia

The main objective of the study is to understand the villagers’ standard of living, hardship, external impact, present and future demand. The team interviewed with 15 to 60 villagers including men, women, young and old villagers, represented 135 families in the village. The main occupations of the villagers are farmers cultivating rice on 299 hectares of seasonal rice and 61.8 hectares dry season rice and fishers. Beside that, they have other occupations such as repairers, making thatch.

STREAM Journal Volume 1, No. 3, July-September 2002

In this issue: From resource user to resource manager: A significant change story. Significant change with Cambodian provincial livelihoods study teams. The Community Fisheries Development Office: One year on. CFDO open for business! Stakeholders and institutional involvement in aquaculture management and development. Fish seed production for aquaculture in Southeast Cambodia: Decentralisation - the way to go? About the STREAM Journal. About STREAM. This edition is also available in Ilonggo, Khmer, Nepali and Vietnamese.

Report of the workshop on process monitoring and significant change, 26-28 June 2002

The aim of this workshop was to formulate an approach which would enable participants to start detailed work on a process monitoring system, building on current activities and using already existing skills in Cambodia, Nepal, Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam. Objectives were to familiarise participants with recent developments in process monitoring and significant change, and to develop an action plan for each country and a set of guiding principles for a monitoring system to underpin work in all countries.

STREAM Journal Volume 1, No. 2, April-June 2002

In this issue: Efforts of a farmer in fish seed production for self-employment. Remembering: The missing capacity. Measuring the process. Women's fish farmers group in Nawalparasi, Nepal. Periphyton-based aquaculture: A sustainable technology for resource-poor farmers. Unlocking information on the internet: STREAM media monitoring and issue tracking. This edition is also available in Ilonggo, Nepali and Vietnamese.

STREAM Journal Volume 1, No. 1, January-March 2002

In this issue: Learning from each other about conflict. e-learning to support knowledge sharing in aquatic resources. Livelihood strategies, gender and participation in aquaculture: Findings from participatory research in northwestern Sri Lanka. Farming of giant tiger shrimp in northern central Vietnam. Interacting with stakeholders and policy-makers. This edition is also available in Ilonggo, Khmer, Nepali and Vietnamese.

The STREAM Initiative: Promoting participation, communication and policies that support the livelihoods of poor aquatic resource users in the Asia-Pacific

STREAM is a regional initiative that will support capacity building among local government institutions, NGOs, and community groups involved in aquatic resources management. It will support community-based learning initiatives, develop a regional communications and learning strategy and support on-going policy and institutional changes in the region to enable aquatic resources users to participate more effectively in policy-making processes, and encouraging the development of more responsive government institutions.

Reaching the rural poor: Developing a strategy for the promotion and dissemination of participatory aquaculture research - a case study from eastern India

This paper reports on the development of a communication dissemination strategy for aquaculture recommendations resulting from participatory research in eastern India. It focuses on the rural poor who have limited access to resources and no effective aquaculture extension support. Important matters in relation to access to extension messages include socio-economic issues, access to TV and radio receivers, literacy levels and language. The paper shows the relative accessibility of different types of extension media for the different stakeholders.

Aquaculture Asia Magazine

Aquaculture Asia Magazine is an autonomous publication that gives farmers and scientists in developing countries a voice. Stories concern the small-scale aquaculture prevalent in the region and the circumstances of farmers trying to make ends meet in an increasingly globalised world. We accept articles on any aspect of aquaculture and the related processing, marketing, economic, environmental and social issues. An RSS feed is available if you wish to stay informed of new issues.

Food security, safety and certification

The constantly changing regulatory environment and safety requirements of importing countries pose a special challenge to small-scale aquaculture producers. The programme assists members to assure the safety and quality of aquaculture products through the adoption of science-based better management practices. Policy issues concerning aquaculture certification and activities in market access are also addressed. The programme focuses on assisting small-scale farmers to adapt to the changing trade and safety environment through cooperative-based approaches.