Environment and sustainability

Global population is forecast to reach around 9 billion by 2050. To feed the world, global agricultural output must increase by around 60% from present levels. This must be achieved against a background of increasing competition for natural resources such as water, feed ingredients and farming sites.

Maintaining environmental integrity while massively increasing food production will require farming systems to reduce their unit production environmental footprint. Many farming practices that are regarded as sustainable today will not be acceptable when scaled up. Sustainable intensification of aquaculture means doing more with less. The Sustainable Farming Systems Programme aims to help aquaculture become a more efficient user of natural resources, both in terms of farm productivity and environmental efficiency.

The programme develops better management practices for major aquaculture farming systems, and promotes aquaculture as a secondary or additional use of water resources. The programme focusses on practical interventions that can be directly achieved by small-scale farmers in a developing country context.

Key activities

Key activities of the programme are:

  • Development of better management practices for key aquaculture production systems.
  • Organising small-scale farmers into associations to facilitate cluster-based approaches to extension.
  • Development of culture-based fisheries as a secondary use of water bodies.
  • Development of strategic policy frameworks to guide governments and development agencies in promoting sustainable intensification of aquaculture.

Related

Subject tags

A collection of subject tags relating to technical matters.

In this collection

The integration of mangrove and shrimp farming: A case study on the Caribbean coast of Colombia

Shrimp aquaculture has been accused of threatening mangrove forests worldwide. Mangrove and shrimp ponds are known to have mutually supportive functions. Mangrove wetlands can treat effluents from shrimp ponds effectively by removing suspended solids and nutrients. This activity can be expected, in turn, to enhance mangrove productivity. This report describes an integrated mangrove wetland–shrimp farm operating in Colombia since 1996. At this site, shrimp farm effluent is recirculated through an 120 ha mangrove area.

The adoption of good management practices by the shrimp industry on the Caribbean coast of Colombia

This report discusses the recent history of shrimp aquaculture along the Caribbean coast of Colombia, with a focus on effective management practices that have been implemented since the mid-1990s. While the primary reason for using different practices has been preventing outbreaks of shrimp diseases, many such practices provide environmental benefits as well. Examples include reducing the use of water and ensuring that effluent entering natural water bodies is at least as clean as the intake water.

Key management challenges for the development and growth of a shrimp farm in northeast Brazil: A case study of Camanor Produtos Marinhos Ltda.

This case study discusses the main lessons for management practices learned at the shrimp farm Camanor, in Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil. Since it was founded in 1982, the farm has yielded data that allow the lessons and insights to be drawn. This case documents the most important lessons learned by Camanor during the past 18 years. The most important challenges before the shrimp aquaculture industry involve developing better practices and implementing industry wide standards that are more sustainable.

Shrimp farming in Brazil: An industry overview

The purpose of this study is to assess the development of the shrimp farming industry in Brazil, identifying past obstacles and key incentives for its expansion. The shrimp industry has taken longer to develop in Brazil than in other countries. Despite favorable conditions, it is only recently that successful efforts are consolidating. This report analyzes the main factors that have inhibited the development of the industry and describes the sector's current characteristics.

Aquaculture Asia Magazine, January-March 2005

In this issue:

Freshwater prawn culture in China and its market prospects. Demise of wastewater-fed duckweed-based aquaculture in Bangladesh. Freshwater finfish biodiversity - an Asian perspective. Her farm is destroyed, how can we help? Women oyster vendors in Eastern Thailand. Farm-level feeds and feeding practices for marine finfish. ACIAR grouper grow-out feeds and CSIRO research. Feed development and application for juvenile grouper. Grouper growout feeds. Silver pomfret culture technology.

A prototype warm water shrimp hatchery

A successful hatchery usually depends on a number of conditions; among the more important ones are right choice of site, effectiveness and efficiency of operational management. The present technology series attempts to describe the prototype warm water shrimp hatchery established and operated by SEAFDEC Aquaculture Department in collaboration with FAO since 1982. The techniques used in the operation of the hatchery have been refined, repeatedly tested and are now packaged for further testing in different environmental conditions elsewhere in the Philippines and other tropical countries.

Aquaculture Development Beyond 2000: The Bangkok Declaration and Strategy

The main output of the International Conference on Aquaculture in the Third Millennium. The Declaration summarises the key impediments and opportunities in aquaculture development that are likely to arise over the next 20 years and provides strategic policy guidance for sustainable aquaculture development. The Declaration was adopted by conference participants in a plenary session.

Aquaculture Asia Magazine, October-December 2004

In this issue:

Captive breeding of vulnerable Indian carp Cirrhinus reba for conservation. Conservation of the Asiatic catfish Clarias batrachus through artificial propagation. A perspective on breeding and genetics of walking catfish in Thailand. Decline of wastewater-fed aquaculture in Hanoi. Artificial propagation of indigenous Tor species in Malaysia. Aquaculture of spotted babylon Babylonia areolata. First successful hatchery production of Napoleon wrasse Cheilinus undulatus. Trade and market trends in the live reef fish trade.

Aquaculture Asia Magazine, July-September 2004

In this issue:

Genetic considerations in fisheries and aquaculture with regards to biodiversity. Rice-fish culture for food and environmental security. Land-based aquaculture of spotted babylon Babylonia areolata in Thailand: Hatchery-based seedling operation. Shrimp health question and answer. Women in coastal aquaculture. Insights into live marine food fish markets in Asia. Farming practices, market chains and prices of marine finfish in Malaysia, Indonesia and Hong Kong.

Chemical and biological amendments used in shrimp farming (abstract)

This article compares the use of chemical and biological amendments in shrimp farming in Asia and the Americas. The information comes mainly from the author’s experience in Thailand and Ecuador, as well as from the literature. The amendments are discussed according to three major categories: (1) water and soil quality management products, (2) biocides, and (3) feed additives. Certain agents, while necessary to successful shrimp farming, should be used only when needed and in a safe and responsible manner.