Commercial trout farming in Uttarakhand has advanced progressively during the last decade and has become a profitable occupation among the rural masses especially in the colder regimes where no other fish farming has possibilities. The rainbow trout here plays the most dominant role as a commercially important candidate species for culture in this hill locked Himalayan state of India. This article describes the current status of trout fisheries resources and trout aquaculture in Uttarakhand, and their potential further development.

In this issue:

Framework for participatory linkage of marine ornamentals germplasm conservation to livelihoods: Is community aquaculture an inclusive option? Induced breeding of farm-bred and pond-raised critically endangered peninsular carp, Hypselobarbus pulchellus; A way forward for utilisation of aquatic genetic resources in Asia-Pacific: Synthesis from deliberations during the Regional Workshop on Underutilized Fish and Marine Genetic Resources and their Amelioration 2019; Cast nets: The dominant active fishing gear in the Kashmir Valley; Moyna model of major carp farming in Purba Medinipur District, West Bengal, India; NACA Newsletter.

Hypselobarbus pulchellus is endemic to the peninsular rivers of India, mainly the Krishna, Godavari, Tungabhadra, Sita and Tunga. It once formed a major fishery of the Tungabhadra reservoir but has declined to the status of a critically endangered species. H. pulchellus is a bentho-pelagic species which inhabits the deeper part of large streams and rivers along the base of ghats. It is the only indigenous fish that consumes aquatic weeds and submerged grasses, and could play a role in controlling aquatic vegetation in reservoirs, tanks and irrigation canals. Capable of attaining 8 kg, H. pulchellus would make a welcome addition to pond culture practices of India, especially for composite fish culture. This article gives an overview of the breeding and seed production technologies developed by ICAR-CIFA for farm-bred and pond-raised H. pulchelllus.

The ‘Moyna Model’ is accepted as an example for freshwater fish culture throughout West Bengal. Moyna is a great example of the freshwater fish culture revolution in West Bengal and a new horizon for culture of the major carps. Moyna fish farmers have adapted the procedures of Andhra farmers incorporating their own blend of experience, skill and technology. This article describes the history and development of major carp culture practices in Moyna, challenges faced by the industry including groundwater exploitation, and documents the experience of some progressive farmers.

A free webinar on important parasites of marine and freshwater fish will be held on 9 December 2020, from 13:00-16:00 Bangkok time (GMT + 7). Topics include: Parasites of freshwater fish; Sea lice problem in marine fish aquaculture in the Philippines; Neobenedenia: Can we innovate to successfully manage this parasite in sea cages?; and Marine leech: From life cycle to control measures. Participation is free for all but registration is required.

The 86th edition of the Quarterly Aquatic Animal Disease Report contains information from fifteen governments. The foreword provides a discussion of a webinar on decapod iridescent virus 1 (DIV1), held on 20 August 2020.

In this issue:

Hatchery techniques for the seed production of short-necked clams (Paphia undulata) in Nha Trang, Vietnam; Lovesome chum of the aquarium are wreaking havoc in East Kolkata Wetlands, India; Concept of indigenous recirculatory aquaculture system executed in West Bengal, India and other places; Homestead modular hatchery technology of brackishwater catfish, Mystus gulio: A potential alternate livelihood option for small and marginal farmers of Sunderban; NACA Newsletter.

In this issue:

Vale Professor Sena De Silva; the State of World Fisheries and Aquaculture 2020; Viral covert mortality disease (VCMD): Disease card; Disease advisory: Decapod iridescent virus 1 (DIV1): An emerging threat to the shrimp industry; Infection with decapod iridescent virus 1 (DIV1): Disease card; Proceedings of the Regional Workshop on Underutilized Fish and Marine Genetic Resources and their Amelioration; Latest special issue of Gender, Technology & Development examines new learnings on women and fisheries; Development of a global information system for farmed types of aquatic genetic resources; Quarterly Aquatic Animal Disease Report, October-December 2019.

The catfish Mystus gulio is a small indigenous euryhaline fish found in fresh and brackishwater environments of the Sunderban delta of Bangladesh and India. A fast-growing species with high nutritional value, market demand and hardy nature, M. gulio is a desirable candidate for aquaculture in Asia. It is co-cultured with other brackishwater species in paddy fields, but expansion of culture in pond systems has been held back because of a shortage of seed. This article reports on induced breeding techniques and the development of a farmer-friendly modular hatchery and farming system suitable for use at the homestead level or by small-scale operators.

The workshop was held from 10-12 July 2019, Colombo, Sri Lanka. The objectives of the workshop were to i) assess the current status of underutilised aquatic genetic resources at the regional level and to assess R&D status of priority species with potential for use in food and agriculture; ii) discuss knowledge gaps and regional priorities concerning underutilised genetic resources and create awareness on their role and value for diversification of food supplies and livelihoods; and iii) formulate strategies for strengthening the institutional framework for management and conservation of genetic resources at the regional level.