Health

The Aquatic Animal Health Programme assists members to reduce the risks of aquatic animal disease impacting the livelihoods of farmers, national economies, trade, environment and human health by:

  • Improving regional cooperation in aquatic animal health and welfare.
  • Developing and implementing national strategies on aquatic animal health.
  • Improving surveillance, reporting and response to disease emergencies.
  • Promoting harmonisation of diagnostic procedures and risk assessment.
  • Widespread promotion of better aquatic animal health management practices at the farm level.

Key activities

Key activities of the programme include:

  • Convening the annual meeting of the Asia Regional Advisory Group on Aquatic Animal Health, coordinating the Quarterly Aquatic Animal Disease Report and bringing regional issues to the attention of global standard setting bodies such as the Office International des Epizooties.
  • Establishment and expansion of a three-tier shared resource in aquatic animal health.
  • Development of farm-level health management tools for key aquaculture commodities.
  • Supporting regional disease surveillance and reporting.
  • Strengthening aquatic animal health and biosecurity in the region.
  • Facilitating harmonisation in disease diagnostic techniques.
  • Developing resource material in support of diagnosis and surveillance.

Contacts

Related

Subject tags

A collection of subject tags relating to technical matters.

In this collection

Aquaculture Asia Magazine, January-March 2017

In this issue:

Anti-microbial resistance in aquaculture; participatory market chain approaches to boost fish nurseries; traditional community fishing practices of rural Assam; practical significance of restricted feeding regimes in aquaculture; Bangana dero: A potential indigenous fish species for diversification of carp culture; shell colour variation in farmed Litopenaeus vannamei: Comparison of white- and brown-shelled shrimp; culture-based fisheries: A low-tech, greenhouse friendly approach to improving food and income for Cambodian families.

NACA Newsletter, Vol. XXXII, No. 1-2, January-June 2017

In this issue:

The 15th meeting of the Asia Regional Advisory Group on Aquatic Animal Health; a regional consultation on responsible production and use of feed in aquaculture; a report on the Giant Prawn 2017 conference; a preview of the new NACA website; and new initiatives on a very serious emerging issue - reducing the human and animal health risks from development of anti-microbial resistance in the aquaculture industry.

A warning and an improved PCR detection method for tilapia lake virus (TiLV) disease in Thai tilapia farms

Tilapia lake virus (TiLV) is an emerging virus that causes syncytial hepatitis of tilapia with mortalities of up to 90%. Recent disease outbreaks in Thai tilapia farms have been associated with high cumulative mortalities and histopathological features typical of SHT. Infection has now been confirmed. The semi-nested RT-PCR protocol described here may be used freely for non-commercial applications to detect TiLV. The authors urge laboratories in Asia to test for TiLV when abnormal tilapia mortality occurs.

Reducing health risks from anti-microbial resistance in aquaculture

The development of resistant strains of disease-causing microorganisms is an important health issue of global concern. When microbes such as bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses become resistant to antimicrobial substances, the diseases they may cause become more difficult or impossible to treat. Resistance is developed by the indiscriminate use of antimicrobials and places human health at risk. The discovery of antibiotics revolutionised medicine, creating a belief that a 'magic bullet' had finally been found to control bacterial diseases. Antibiotics, a class of antimicrobial agents, kill or inhibit the growth of bacteria, but they have no significant effect on other types of microorganisms such as viruses.

Giant Prawn 2017

The fourth major international event on giant freshwater prawns was organised by the Asian Institute of Technology from 20-24 March 2007. The conference, organised by Salin Krishna and Michael New, built on a series of highly successful events that trace back to the very beginnings of the industry. The first conference, Giant Prawn 1980 brought together all those involved in freshwater prawn research and farming for the first time and set many priorities for future research and development.

Report of the fifteenth meeting of the Asia Regional Advisory Group on Aquatic Animal Health, 21-23 November 2016

The Asia Regional Advisory Group on Aquatic Animal Health meets annually to discuss regional health issues including emerging disease threats. This report includes a review of regional disease status circa 2016, global and regional disease reporting arrangements, global issues and standards, progress in implementation of the the Regional Technical Guidelines on Health management for the Responsible Movement of Live Aquatic Animals, identification and designation of regional aquatic animal health resources and regional and international cooperation.

10th Symposium on Diseases in Asian Aquaculture, 28 August - 1 September 2017, Bali, Indonesia

We invite you to join us for the 10th Symposium on Diseases in Asian Aquaculture (DAA10), the popular triennial event of the Fish Health Section of the Asian Fisheries Society (FHS-AFS), to be held from 28 August to 1 September 2017 at the Anvaya Beach Resort, Kuta, Bali, Indonesia.

With the chosen theme of “Enhancing Aquatic Animal Health Research and Services through Public-Private Sector Partnerships” we anticipate to cover topics from classic parasitic, bacterial and viral diseases to emerging trends and cutting-edge research in aquatic animal health.

Three satellite workshops: FAO’s Inter-regional Workshop, NACA’s Meeting of the Asia Regional Advisory Group on Aquatic Animal Health, and a Bioinformatics Workshop are being organised back-to-back with DAA10.

15th meeting of the Asia Regional Advisory Group on Aquatic Animal Health

The 15th meeting was held from 21-23 November 2016, in Bangkok, Thailand. A special session was held on addressing the use of anti-microbial substances in aquaculture and the development of anti-microbial resistance. This is an issue of global concern for both human and animal health, and it had been addressed by a resolution at FAO’s Thirty-ninth Conference in June 2015. The meeting reviewed in detail the status of aquatic animal disease in the region.

The objective of this project was to develop an agreed code of practice for the transboundary movement of aquatic organisms that feeds into the fisheries management strategy for the lower Mekong basin. The code of practice provides guidance on risk management and mitigation measures be taken into account for live aquatic animal imports or other transfers that are part of the established commercial practice, or those related to scientific study at research facilities.

A new and improved PCR detection method for Enterocytozoon hepatopenaei (EHP) based on a gene encoding a spore wall protein

Hepatopancreatic microsporidiosis (HPM) caused by Enterocytozoon hepatopenaei (EHP) is a newly emerging disease of cultivated shrimp in Asia. Current evidence indicates that it can be associated with severe growth retardation that may not be clearly evident until the second month of culture and may cause low continuous mortality in the case of very severe infections. We present a new method for detecting EHP that has superior specificity to the first generation SSU-PCR developed in 2009.