The abundant aquatic resources of Jammu and Kashmir harbour a wide variety of indigenous and exotic fish species make it one of the promising areas for coldwater and hill stream fisheries. The fish fauna of Kashmir Valley is mainly represented by the families Cyprinidae, Cobitidae, Silurideae, Poecilideae, Sisorideae and Salmonideae. The fisheries sector in Kashmir valley has huge potential but is yet to gain momentum. This article describes the fish fauna of the lakes of Jammu and Kashmir, and some of the indigenous fishing gears commonly used by people living in the area.

In this issue:

Mahseer sanctuaries of Meghalaya: A conservation and recreational perspective; Impacts of climate change on aquaculture in Vietnam: A review of local knowledge; Simple means of water aeration adopted by progressive fish breeders in West Bengal, India; Breeding striped snakehead (Channa striata) using the concrete tank method in the Cangkringan Area, Special Region of Yogyakarta; NACA Newsletter.

This article presents available information regarding the present status of chocolate mahseer and the conservation measures been undertaken in the East Garo Hills of Meghalaya. A total of 54 sanctuaries have been established since 2012 in Garo, Khasi and Jaintia hills under the Meghalaya State Aquaculture Mission project of the Fish Farmers Development Agency. The sanctuaries have been established with the objective to preserve and enhance aquatic biodiversity, protect indigenous fish species, preserve breeding and feeding grounds, and serve as tourist attractions to provide livelihood opportunities.

In India, West Bengal is the leading state in hatchery-based seed production (spawn, fry, advanced fry) of major carps and other economically important freshwater fishes. Dissolved oxygen is the most critical parameter of water quality and basic necessity in fish hatcheries, nursery and grow-out ponds. Hatchery fish seed production can be limited by the dissolved oxygen content of circulating water. Progressive fish breeders in villages of West Bengal have overcome and eliminated this problem by designing simple but effective means of water aeration to improve dissolved oxygen in hatchery water supplies, maximising survival of fertilised eggs, hatchlings and spawn. This article describes some of the techniques that have been adopted using low-cost and recycled materials.

The 83rd edition of the Quarterly Aquatic Animal Disease report contains information from twelve governments. The foreword discusses the upcoming 11th Symposium on Diseases in Asian Aquaculture (DAA 11), which will be held from 29 September to 2 October 2020, at the Borneo Convention Center, Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia.

The 35th Session of Asia-Pacific Fishery Commission has identified the lack of effective governance as a major threat to sustainable aquaculture growth for greater contribution to achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals. The objectives of the consultation were to: Share the results of country studies on aquaculture governance in respective countries; identify gaps, issues and challenges in aquaculture governance; and recommend strategies and actions to improve and strengthen aquaculture governance.

Audio recording of presentation delivered at the Consultation on Strengthening Governance of Aquaculture for Sustainable Development in Asia-Pacific, 5-6 November 2019, Bangkok, Thailand.

In this issue:

Trends in water chestnut Trapa bispinosa farming in West Bengal, India; Improving livelihoods and increasing coastal resilience: A look at integrated mangrove-shrimp aquaculture in Vietnam; Snow trout fisheries in Arunachal Pradesh of the Eastern Himalayas; Gender issues in the fisheries sector of India; NACA Newsletter.

Water chestnut Trapa bispinosa (or paanifol in Bengali vernacular) is a perennial aquatic herb and economically important crop of lentic freshwater bodies. It is commercially cultivated for its edible fruit in shallow perennial ponds, wetlands and railway track-side water bodies. The fruit are harvested only in the post-monsoon until the beginning of winter. This article describes the farming and management of water chestnut, market chains, economic returns and role of this crop in the livelihoods of farmers in West Bengal, India.

Snow trout are known for their economic importance and are recognised as potential species for food and recreation. However, very little information is available on their taxonomy, distribution, biology, habitat and food value. The demand for this group of fish has increased drastically with increasing fishing pressure due to the lack of sustained aquaculture alternatives in this hill locked part of the world. This article describes the status of snow trout fisheries in the snow fed streams, rivers and upland lakes of Arunachal Pradesh, India.