The practice of collecting penaeid shrimp seed and prawn seed from inundated agricultural fields adjacent to the Rupnarayan River has become a supplementary source of income for local communities. During the wet season each year, the river floods the extended open tract of unsown paddy fields. This article describes the traditional fishing practices, gear and livelihoods associated with capture and grow out of shrimp and prawn seed in this region of West Bengal, India.

In this issue:

Invasive apple snails (Pomacea spp.) in Vietnam: Short review; A review of fresh water integrated multi-trophic aquaculture: Catching up on the dream of a blue revolution in India; Pre-pupae (larvae) of black soldier fly - a potential alternate protein source for aquaculture feeds; Penaeid shrimp and giant prawn seed collection from Rupnarayan River in Purba Medinipur, West Bengal, India; NACA Newsletter; First training course on culture-based fisheries held in Nha Trang, Vietnam.

In this issue:

28th NACA Governing Council, Dhaka, Bangladesh; register for the First Regional Training Course on Culture-based Fisheries; 11th Indian Fisheries and Aquaculture Forum, Kochi, 21-24 November; audio recordings for regional feed consultation now available; tilapia lake virus; Proceedings of the International Symposium on Aquatic Animal Health and Epidemiology for Sustainable Asian Aquaculture; ICAR-CIBA launch "Vanami Shrimpapp", a mobile app on Pacific white shrimp (Penaeus vannamei) farming; Pakistan officials train on aquaculture certification.

The Asian Institute of Technology (AIT) is launching a new Certificate programme on Sustainable Asian Aquaculture via the AARM Academic programme, for one semester beginning August 2017. This certificate programme is a combination of well-designed course work and hands-on experience in specialised areas (fish/shrimp hatchery or farming). The programme is useful for both students (with credit transfer) and for working professionals and entrepreneurs (without credits).

In this issue:

Inspiring story of aquaculture in Sikkim - a journey from conservation to farming; farming of scampi and tiger shrimp together - a case study from West Bengal; Labeo pangusia - a candidate for diversification of hill aquaculture; sustainability of an integrated livestock-fish-crop farming system as a small scale enterprise; sustainable coastal aquaculture in India; potential scope and prospects of domestic fish market in Chhattisgarh.

We report on an Indian farmer co-culturing tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon and the giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii. The farm utilises wild-caught riverine seed, stocked at a relatively low density and fed on a Macrobrachium pellet which P. monodon also accepts.

Coastal aquaculture in India was historically focussed mainly on tiger shrimp farming (Penaeus monodon) but production issues and disease led to the introduction of SPF Pacific white shrimp (L. vannamei) in 2009. A robust technical and legal framework was established by the Coastal Aquaculture Authority. Improved regulation has improved sustainability of the sector and underpinned production, with farmed Pacific shrimp output rising from 1,731 tonnes in 2009-2010 to 353,413 tonnes in 2014-2015.

In this issue:

Anti-microbial resistance in aquaculture; participatory market chain approaches to boost fish nurseries; traditional community fishing practices of rural Assam; practical significance of restricted feeding regimes in aquaculture; Bangana dero: A potential indigenous fish species for diversification of carp culture; shell colour variation in farmed Litopenaeus vannamei: Comparison of white- and brown-shelled shrimp; culture-based fisheries: A low-tech, greenhouse friendly approach to improving food and income for Cambodian families.

The regular shell colour of farmed Litopenaeus vannamei is off-white to greenish-white but instances of L. vannamei with brown-shell colour do occur in farmed shrimp. A study was conducted to determine if there were differences vis-à-vis shell colour, meat colour, meat composition and meat texture. White-shelled vannamei was determined to be better in terms of meat composition and texture profile but brown-shelled vannamei yielded a more brightly red-coloured cooked product.

The Asia Regional Advisory Group on Aquatic Animal Health meets annually to discuss regional health issues including emerging disease threats. This report includes a review of regional disease status circa 2016, global and regional disease reporting arrangements, global issues and standards, progress in implementation of the the Regional Technical Guidelines on Health management for the Responsible Movement of Live Aquatic Animals, identification and designation of regional aquatic animal health resources and regional and international cooperation.