Women play an essential role in the fisheries sector of India. They make an immense contribution by engaging in varied activities. They may engage as paid or unpaid workers both in pre and post-harvest activities, in seafood processing plants, as caregivers of the fisher family - maintaining social networks and culture of the community and as members of fish worker movements and fisher’s organisations. However, their contribution often remains invisible or understated. This article examines the contribution of women to the fisheries sector in India, identifies constraints and suggests ways to address these issues.

EHP or Enterocytozoon hepatopenaei is a fungal microsporidian parasite that infects the hepatopancreas (hp) of tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) and whiteleg shrimp (P. vannamei) in Thailand and results in slow growth and, in chronic infections, mortalities. EHP is also known from Brunei, China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Venezuela and Vietnam. This fact sheet provides information on the EHP life cycle, signs of infection, diagnosis and management in both hatcheries and growout, as well technical contacts for further information.

The 82nd edition of the Quarterly Aquatic Animal Disease report contains information from eleven governments. The foreword welcomes Dr Huang Jie, NACA's new Director General, a health specialist that has previously participated in the Asia-Pacific Regional Advisory Group on Aquatic Animal Health.

Two consultations were held back to back in Thailand from 5-7 November, namely the Consultation on Strengthening Governance of Aquaculture for Sustainable Development in Asia-Pacific and the Consultation on Demographic Changes in Fishing Communities in Asia. The consultations were held at the Centara Grand Hotel at Ladprao, Bangkok. The consultations were attended by 29 participants from 15 countries in the Asia-Pacific region. The consultations were jointly organised by FAO and NACA. Audio recordings are available of some presentations.

The 81st edition of the Quarterly Aquatic Animal Disease report contains information from twelve governments. The foreword discusses the proposed Regional Collaboration Framework on Aquatic Animal Diseases in Asia and the Pacific. This will initially focus on building a framework of actors with the aim of strengthening laboratory capacity for aquatic animal disease activities in Asia and the Pacific, for example to support emergency response. 

In this issue:

Farming of Asian seabass Lates calcarifer in freshwater impoundments in West Bengal, India; An integrated approach to contemporary fish farming practice incorporating traditional knowledge in mid hills in India: A success story; Mud crab farming: An alternative livelihood in the Indian Sundarban; Trout fisheries resources and potentialities in the Menchukha region of Arunachal Pradesh; NACA Newsletter.

The success of any aquaculture project or fish farm depends to a large extent on selection of a suitable site. Site selection using the conventional method, based on very limited data, can result in inaccurate information and cause discrepancies among the implementing agencies. The utilisation of remote sensing and geographic information systems can provide a useful source of additional information. This article provides a GIS-based analysis of the suitability of sites for trout farming and the establishment of sport fisheries in the Menchukha valley, Arunachal Pradesh.

Mud crab is one of the most valuable crustaeceans in both domestic and export markets. They are hardy and can survive out of water for extended periods at lower temperatures, making them idea for live export. Mud crab fattening predominates farming practices in Sundarban as opposed to grow-out culture. This report describes current practces adopted by mud crab farmers in India with special reference to the Indian Sundarban, where mud crab capture and farming are an important livelihood for small holder farmers.

Farming in the mid hills is largely characterised by small land holdings, low productivity, scarcity of agricultural land and irrigation facilities, and uneven terrain. Low returns in farming and unemployment problems in the mid-hills are compelling youth to move to the cities to find livelihoods. Adoption of integrated farming practices utilising available land, water and waste products more efficiently can improve farm productivity and income. The achievements of a young farmer from a remote village working to motivate others are documented in this article.

The Asian seabass Lates calcarifer is a highly preferred foodfish in West Bengal, with a high meat content and commercial value compared to Indian major carps. Found in estuarine systems on the north-east and south-east coasts of the Bay of Bengal, Asian seabass is a hardy, euryhaline fish and suitable for culture in coastal marine, inland saline, brackishwater and freshwater ecosystems. During the past decade, Asian seabass has received greater attention and has been increasingly farmed commercially in modified-extensive systems in large freshwater impoundments (termed ‘mithen gheri’ in local dialect).