In this issue:

Concept of seed production of Heteropneustes fossilis in farmers' fields in West Bengal, India; Fishing gear and practices in flood waters of Assam; Fisherwomen empowerment: Shedding light on the invisible gender; Integrated multi-trophic aquaculture systems: A solution of sustainability.

Annual flooding of the Brahmaputra and Barak rivers provides Assam with some of the finest floodplain wetlands in India. Local people have adapted their livelihoods to the flood cycle and fishing remains a traditional activity of tremendous importance in rural communities, with a diverse range of fishing gear and methods developed. This article documents some of the major fishing gears of Assam, with reference to their efficacy and targeted fish species.

Women's engagement in fisheries can be viewed from social, political and technical perspectives, all of which show that the role of women is often underestimated. In the fisheries sector participation by women may only become visible after the landing of the catch. The inadequate recognition of women's contributions hampers development, slowing progress in reduction of poverty and food insecurity. This article examines the diversity of women's involvement in fisheries and aquaculture and highlights opportunities to increase the participation of women.

Aquaculture has seen spectacular growth in recent years, and Aqua 2018 celebrated aquaculture’s role as one of the most important food industries worldwide. Held 25-29 August in Montpellier, France, Aqua 2018 brought together scientists, practitioners, students, industry and civil society to highlight the latest global developments in aquaculture research and innovation.

Makhana, Euryale ferox is a perennial aquatic herb with gigantic floating leaves that grows in still, shallow water. The sowing and harvesting of makhana seeds, a casual food for rural folk, is conducted by groups of migratory people belonging to the Mallah or Sahini community of Bihar. The makhana seeds are usually fallen and scattered over the bottom of the wetlands (beels) and must be collected manually by diving during September-November. The raw seeds sell for Rs. 60-70 per kg in Assam.

India’s share of the international ornamental fish trade is marginal but has been able to show consistent growth over the years. Of the total ornamental fishes traded by India, approximately 85% are native fishes sourced from the Western Ghats and North East India. The aquaculture of native fishes in seasonal water bodies can play a role in both conservation and generation of livelihoods. Imparting knowledge regarding ornamental fish trade and establishing market linkages is required to further develop the industry.

In this issue:

29th Governing Council Meeting held in Malé, Maldives; Proceedings of the Emergency Regional Consultation for Prevention and Management of Tilapia Lake Virus in the Asia-Pacific; NACA signs MOU on cooperation with the Bangladesh Shrimp and Fish Foundation; Aquaculture in China: Success Stories and Modern Trends; Quarterly Aquatic Animal Disease Report; Gender in Aquaculture and Fisheries 2018; International Training Course on the Biology and Pathology of Penaeid Shrimp; ASEAN-India Research Training Fellowships and more.

The 7th Global Symposium jointly organised by Gender in Aquaculture and Fisheries Section of the Asian Fisheries Society and Asian Institute of Technology (AIT) will be held at AIT, Bangkok during 18-20 October 2018. GAF conferences endeavour to explore the expanding horizons of gender dimensions in aquaculture and fisheries, while highlighting the need for expanding gender inclusiveness and equity. Renowned researchers from around the world will present papers on various topics related to gender issues in aquaculture and fisheries policy and practice.

Health and safety within the global aquaculture industry is widely overlooked – despite the sector posing a great risk to workers, according to University of Stirling-led research. The project found the world’s estimated 18 million aquaculture workers regularly contend with “highly hazardous” conditions and workplace injury and disease risks are high. While some aquaculture workers are highly trained and in secure jobs globally, most are from vulnerable populations in precarious work, including women, indigenous people, children, seasonal workers, migrant workers, rural and remote workers.

Mahseer in recreational fisheries and ecotourism in India; Small-scale aquaculture of wild fish in Myanmar: A preliminary report from the Bago Region; Current know how and possibility for growout culture of an endangered catfish, Horabagrus brachysoma; Accelerated poverty alleviation of tribal households - cage fish farming by displaced fishers in reservoirs of Jharkhand; Adaptive learning in sustainable aquaculture: Best practices for small-scale shrimp farmers in Thailand; NACA Newsletter.