In this issue:

Potential new species in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia: Sabaki tilapia (Oreochromis spilurus); Role of fish & fisheries in national nutrition of Pakistan; Success story of first fish farmer in India to be awarded ‘Padma Shri’; Insights into the fishing gear and ichthyofauna of major lentic water bodies of Kashmir Valley; NACA Newsletter.

The fisheries sector of Pakistan comprises over 290,000 square kilometres of marine waters and 8.6 million hectares of inland water resources including the world’s largest irrigation system and favourable climatic conditions for aquaculture development. Despite these promising circumstances Pakistan stands thirty-third in world fisheries production. This article considers the true fish production potential of Pakistan and makes a comparison with other regional countries that produce more despite having less water resources, e.g. Bangladesh. Considering the ground reality and gaps in fisheries statistics collection, assessment and reporting, the possibility that fish production and consumption are under reported is explored.

Instituted in 1954, the Padma Shri is awarded by the Government of India to Indian citizens on occasion of Republic Day in recognition of their distinguished service and contribution. Sri Batakrushna Sahoo, an elderly, progressive fish breeder and seed producer of Odisha State, was conferred with the Padma Shri Award in 2020 in the discipline of animal husbandry. He is only the second person to receive it from the fishery and aquaculture sector. This article documents Sr Sahoo’s beginnings, early entry into fish seed production, his success and role in educating others over the years.

The abundant aquatic resources of Jammu and Kashmir harbour a wide variety of indigenous and exotic fish species make it one of the promising areas for coldwater and hill stream fisheries. The fish fauna of Kashmir Valley is mainly represented by the families Cyprinidae, Cobitidae, Silurideae, Poecilideae, Sisorideae and Salmonideae. The fisheries sector in Kashmir valley has huge potential but is yet to gain momentum. This article describes the fish fauna of the lakes of Jammu and Kashmir, and some of the indigenous fishing gears commonly used by people living in the area.

In this issue:

Urgent warning: Positive PCR detection results for infectious myonecrosis virus (IMNV) and decapod iridescent virus 1 (DIV1) in captured Penaeus monodon from the Indian Ocean; COVID-19 news; Urgent announcement on usefulness of the lymphoid organ (LO) as an additional prime target for diagnosis of decapod iridescent virus 1 (DIV1) in diseased P. vannamei; Fresh or frozen seafood?; Report of the Eighteenth Meeting of the Asia Regional Advisory Group on Aquatic Animal Health; COVID-19 fallout could push half a billion people into poverty in developing countries; Simple techniques double crablet production.

In this issue:

Join us for the aquaculture event of the decade! 18th Meeting of the Asia Regional Advisory Group on Aquatic Animal Health; New Director General of the Department of Fisheries, Thailand; Thailand holds National Sea Bass Fair; Tuskfish CMS 2.0 is available; Regional consultations on strengthening aquaculture governance and demographic changes in fishing communities; INFOFISH World Shrimp Conference and Exposition.

In this issue:

Trends in water chestnut Trapa bispinosa farming in West Bengal, India; Improving livelihoods and increasing coastal resilience: A look at integrated mangrove-shrimp aquaculture in Vietnam; Snow trout fisheries in Arunachal Pradesh of the Eastern Himalayas; Gender issues in the fisheries sector of India; NACA Newsletter.

Water chestnut Trapa bispinosa (or paanifol in Bengali vernacular) is a perennial aquatic herb and economically important crop of lentic freshwater bodies. It is commercially cultivated for its edible fruit in shallow perennial ponds, wetlands and railway track-side water bodies. The fruit are harvested only in the post-monsoon until the beginning of winter. This article describes the farming and management of water chestnut, market chains, economic returns and role of this crop in the livelihoods of farmers in West Bengal, India.

In the last decade, integrated mangrove-shrimp aquaculture has emerged as a means of cultivating shrimp while maintaining the benefits of rearing shrimp in their natural environment. Furthermore, mangrove-shrimp aquaculture provides an additional means for farmers to secure livelihoods. Increased mangrove coverage provides considerable benefits to ecosystems and communities. Mangrove forests have also been shown to increase coastal resilience to climate change as they mitigate the effects of climate change and erosion. This research attempts to assess the feasibility of large scale implementation of integrated mangrove-shrimp aquaculture in coastal Vietnam.

Two consultations were held back to back in Thailand from 5-7 November, namely the Consultation on Strengthening Governance of Aquaculture for Sustainable Development in Asia-Pacific and the Consultation on Demographic Changes in Fishing Communities in Asia. The consultations were held at the Centara Grand Hotel at Ladprao, Bangkok. The consultations were attended by 29 participants from 15 countries in the Asia-Pacific region. The consultations were jointly organised by FAO and NACA. Audio recordings are available of some presentations.