In this issue:

Mahseer sanctuaries of Meghalaya: A conservation and recreational perspective; Impacts of climate change on aquaculture in Vietnam: A review of local knowledge; Simple means of water aeration adopted by progressive fish breeders in West Bengal, India; Breeding striped snakehead (Channa striata) using the concrete tank method in the Cangkringan Area, Special Region of Yogyakarta; NACA Newsletter.

In India, West Bengal is the leading state in hatchery-based seed production (spawn, fry, advanced fry) of major carps and other economically important freshwater fishes. Dissolved oxygen is the most critical parameter of water quality and basic necessity in fish hatcheries, nursery and grow-out ponds. Hatchery fish seed production can be limited by the dissolved oxygen content of circulating water. Progressive fish breeders in villages of West Bengal have overcome and eliminated this problem by designing simple but effective means of water aeration to improve dissolved oxygen in hatchery water supplies, maximising survival of fertilised eggs, hatchlings and spawn. This article describes some of the techniques that have been adopted using low-cost and recycled materials.

We are at the beginning of a new revolution, the Internet of Things (IOT): Smart networked devices and sensors that collect information about their surroundings, communicate with people and machines, make decisions based on programming models and interact with the physical world through control of switches, motors and actuators. Many of these devices are low-cost, literally a few dollars and they are getting cheaper all the time. The IOT offers new opportunities for the aquaculture industry to improve on-farm efficiency.

The American Fisheries Society and the Environmental and Water Resources Institute of the American Society of Civil Engineers are holding this year's annual Fish Passage conference in Australia in December in collaboration with hosts Charles Sturt University and the New South Wales Government. The International Conference on River Connectivity, to be held in Albury from December 10 to 14 includes the First International Symposium on Hydropower and Fish Management.

A presentation on assessment of the suitability of water bodies for culture-based fisheries development.

The fourth major international event on giant freshwater prawns was organised by the Asian Institute of Technology from 20-24 March 2007. The conference, organised by Salin Krishna and Michael New, built on a series of highly successful events that trace back to the very beginnings of the industry. The first conference, Giant Prawn 1980 brought together all those involved in freshwater prawn research and farming for the first time and set many priorities for future research and development.

Bangana dero is one of the most popular indigenous minor carps in the north eastern states of India, fetching triple the market prices of Indian major carps. B. dero is a bottom feeder and feeds on insect larvae, molluscs, algae, zooplankton and detritus. Over the last two decades the occurrence of wild juveniles of this fish in Indian rivers has fallen drastically. A protocol for induced breeding, larviculture, nursery rearing and growout including polyculture of B. dero is described.

The Global Conference on Aquaculture 2010 reviewed the present status and trends in aquaculture development, addressed emerging issues relevant to aquaculture development, assessed opportunities and challenges for future aquaculture development and built consensus on advancing aquaculture as a global, sustainable and competitive food production sector. This volume provides information on how aquaculture could be mobilized to alleviate global poverty and improve food and nutrition security in the coming decades.

This practical manual covers key aspects for successful grouper farming including formation of farmer groups, cage crop planning, crop calendar and better management practices for cage aquaculture of grouper. These include site selection, design, cage preparation, seed selection and stocking practices, feed, water and health management, harvest and post-harvest, record keeping, marketing and capital strengthening. It is designed for use by small-scale farmers.

International requirements on food safety, traceability, animal health and welfare and social responsibility are increasingly stringent. The burden of compliance and the cost of certification are particularly heavy for small scale farmers who are often excluded by the limited resources at their disposal. Working in groups can help small scale farmers attain economies of scale necessary to address compliance issues and participate in certification schemes, improving their competitive position.