Aquaculture field schools supporting mangroves for climate change adaptation of Indonesian milkfish-shrimp farmers

Tambak Bulusan
Tambak Bulusan

Over the last five decades, over 30 million people along Java’s north coast have experienced subsidence and subsequent soil erosion. In 2015, Building with Nature Indonesia (BwNI-Demak) started a coastal protection project in 10 communities of nine coastal villages of Demak regency. The protection measures introduced included the use of permeable structures (dams) that successfully capture sediment and support natural recovery of mangroves, and aquaculture field schools, to train small-scale farmers on good aquaculture practices such as:

  • Low external inputs sustainable aquaculture (LEISA).
  • Associated mangrove aquaculture (AMA).
  • Multi-trophic srhimp aquaculture.

This article discusses the practices and outcomes in terms of improved incomes and livelihoods of participating farmers.

Creative Commons Attribution.

Related

Aquaculture Asia Magazine, April-June 2021

In this issue:

Integrated taxonomy, conservation and sustainable development: Multiple facets of biodiversity; A note on 100th birth anniversary of the late Dr Hiralal Chaudhuri; Aquaculture field schools supporting mangroves for climate change adaptation of Indonesian milkfish-shrimp farmers; An insight to red tilapia breeding and culture: A farmer advisory; Aquaculture for livelihoods and food security in North-western India; NACA Newsletter.