The American Fisheries Society and the Environmental and Water Resources Institute of the American Society of Civil Engineers are holding this year's annual Fish Passage conference in Australia in December in collaboration with hosts Charles Sturt University and the New South Wales Government. The International Conference on River Connectivity, to be held in Albury from December 10 to 14 includes the First International Symposium on Hydropower and Fish Management.

Despite their abundance at one time in India and other Asian nations, wild mahseer populations have been declining because of degradation of aquatic ecosystems, urbanisation and indiscriminate fishing. Wild mahseer are populations are presently struggling for their mere existence.

An international workshop on mahseer conservation, propagation and rehabilitation will be held in Bhimtal, India from 23-24 April 2018. The workshop is organised by the ICAR-Directorate of Coldwater Fisheries Research in collaboration with the Coldwater Fisheries Society of India.

The 9th Regional Training Course on Marine Finfish Seed production and Grow-out will be held from 25 June to 13 July 2018 in Krabi, Thailand. The course will be taught by staff of the Krabi Coastal Fisheries Research and Development Centre. Drawing on expertise throughout the region, this three-week hands-on training course will provide participants with skills in marine finfish seed production and grow-out operations, with an emphasis on groupers and Asian seabass.

BRAQCON 2019 wil cover latest research and development in the broader themes of the conference in the form of special sessions, contributed papers, expert group discussions and brainstorming on issues facing aquaculturists and ecosystem managers in India and around the world. The conference themes include: Brackishwater ecosystems, estuarine biodiversity and conservation; aquaculture production systems; larviculture; fish and shellfish nutrition; environment and climate change; aquatic animal health; socio-economic and livelihood issues; and aquaculture genetics and biotechnology.

Offshore Mariculture Asia 2018 will cover the full process of setting up an offshore operation, building on experiences learnt from established operations in the countries who pioneered in this industry. Sessions will begin with an exploration of the early stages of the process such as site selection, moving from nearshore to offshore and choosing the right species, and will culminate with presentations on processes further down the chain such as marketing, investment and technology and feed section.

The practice of collecting penaeid shrimp seed and prawn seed from inundated agricultural fields adjacent to the Rupnarayan River has become a supplementary source of income for local communities. During the wet season each year, the river floods the extended open tract of unsown paddy fields. This article describes the traditional fishing practices, gear and livelihoods associated with capture and grow out of shrimp and prawn seed in this region of West Bengal, India.

Insects form a natural food source for many aquatic animals. This and the presence of chitinase makes insect meals a logical alternative to fish meal in the formulation of aquaculture diets. Insect meals have also been shown to allow for enriching through dietary intake. Of particular interest has been the use of black soldier fly larvae. This article reviews the life history and potential of black soldier fly larval meal to replace fishmeal used in fish diets.

Integrated multi-trophic aquaculture is a flexible concept, on which many variations can be developed and should not be viewed as confined to open-water, marine systems. Freshwater integrated multi-trophic aquaculture, perhaps better known as aquaponics, applies the same principles as those used in marine integrated multi-trophic systems. In particular, using plants to reduce phosphorus (and other nutrient) levels in effluents can help farmers meet water quality guidelines and prevent eutrophication in the environment.

Originating from South America the apple snail species of Pomacea, commonly referred to as golden apple snail, was imported into Vietnam from 1985 to 1988 with the intention of raising it for human consumption. Not long after that, the introduced snails quickly spread to most freshwater ecosystems of the country. This review examines the current status and history of apple snail introduction in Vietnam, and the various control and management measures used to cope with snail infestations. 

In this issue:

Invasive apple snails (Pomacea spp.) in Vietnam: Short review; A review of fresh water integrated multi-tropic aquaculture: Catching up on the dream of a blue revolution in India; Pre-pupae (larvae) of black soldier fly - a potential alternate protein source for aquaculture feeds; Penaeid shrimp and giant prawn seed collection from Rupnarayan River in Purba Medinipur, West Bengal, India; NACA Newsletter; First training course on culture-based fisheries held in Nha Trang, Vietnam.