Training and education

The Education and Training Programme assists capacity building among NACA members through the exchange and sharing of knowledge and skills between members. Activities may take the form of training courses, study visits and personnel exchange. The programme also supports the training components of the other thematic programmes and serves as an outreach arm of NACA. Regular training activities include three to four courses each year on various topics of regional priority in aquaculture development, such as:

  • Broodstock management in aquaculture.
  • Aquaculture business management.
  • Marine finfish seed production.
  • Aquaculture governance and planning.
  • Management for sustainable aquaculture development.

Key activities

Key activities of the programme include:

  • Identifying training needs for aquaculture development in NACA members.
  • Identifying and organising relevant expertise and capacities to meet the training needs.
  • Developing training modules and materials.
  • Facilitating routine education and training activities of NACA.
  • Facilitating and coordinating exchange programmes among members and with other regions.

Related

Subject tags

A collection of subject tags relating to technical matters.

In this collection

Aquaculture Asia Magazine

Aquaculture Asia Magazine is an autonomous publication that gives farmers and scientists in developing countries a voice. Stories concern the small-scale aquaculture prevalent in the region and the circumstances of farmers trying to make ends meet in an increasingly globalised world. We accept articles on any aspect of aquaculture and the related processing, marketing, economic, environmental and social issues. An RSS feed is available if you wish to stay informed of new issues.

Podcasts

NACA publishes audio and video recordings of presentations from technical workshops and conferences. You may listen or view the presentations via the player within the website, or download them for later use. Our audio files are in mp3 format, while video files are in mp4.

Quarterly Aquatic Animal Disease Report

The Quarterly Aquatic Animal Disease report provides information about the status of aquatic animal disease in 21 participating states in the Asia-Pacific region. The diseases covered in the report are reviewed annually by the Asia Regional Advisory Group on Aquatic Animal Health. The report was first published in the second quarter of 1998. It is a joint activity between NACA, FAO and the OIE Regional Representation (Tokyo). 

Australia

Australia's involvement in NACA.

Aquatic plants

Information relating to the aquaculture and mangroves, seaweeds and aquatic plants.

Nutrition and feeding

Information relating to nutrition and feeding in aquaculture.

Inland aquaculture

Information relating to inland aquaculture practices.

Health

The Aquatic Animal Health Programme is a programme of research and development in the field of aquatic animal health. Key Activities of the programme include convening the annual meeting of the Asia Regional Advisory Group on Aquatic Animal Health, coordinating the Quarterly Aquatic Animal Disease Report, bringing regional issues to the attention of global standard setting bodies such as the Office International des Epizooties and facilitating harmonisation in disease diagnostic techniques.

Food security, safety and certification

The constantly changing regulatory environment and safety requirements of importing countries pose a special challenge to small-scale aquaculture producers. The programme assists members to assure the safety and quality of aquaculture products through the adoption of science-based better management practices. Policy issues concerning aquaculture certification and activities in market access are also addressed. The programme focuses on assisting small-scale farmers to adapt to the changing trade and safety environment through cooperative-based approaches.

Culture-based fisheries

Culture-based fisheries (CBF) are stock enhancement practices to improve the productivity of water bodies that do not have enough natural recruitment to support a capture fishery. The stocked seed usually rely on the natural productivity of the water body as food supply.