Health and welfare

The Aquatic Animal Health Programme assists members to reduce the risks of aquatic animal disease impacting the livelihoods of farmers, national economies, trade, environment and human health by:

  • Improving regional cooperation in aquatic animal health and welfare.
  • Developing and implementing national strategies on aquatic animal health.
  • Improving surveillance, reporting and response to disease emergencies.
  • Promoting harmonisation of diagnostic procedures and risk assessment.
  • Widespread promotion of better aquatic animal health management practices at the farm level.

Key activities

Key activities of the programme include:

  • Convening the annual meeting of the Asia Regional Advisory Group on Aquatic Animal Health, coordinating the Quarterly Aquatic Animal Disease Report and bringing regional issues to the attention of global standard setting bodies such as the Office International des Epizooties.
  • Establishment and expansion of a three-tier shared resource in aquatic animal health.
  • Development of farm-level health management tools for key aquaculture commodities.
  • Supporting regional disease surveillance and reporting.
  • Strengthening aquatic animal health and biosecurity in the region.
  • Facilitating harmonisation in disease diagnostic techniques.
  • Developing resource material in support of diagnosis and surveillance.

Contacts

Creative Commons Attribution.

Related

Subject tags

A collection of subject tags relating to technical matters.

In this collection

Infection with koi herpes virus: Disease card

Koi herpes virus (KHV) outbreaks in the region have significant trade implications for the high value ornamental koi carp industry, and the important food fish common carp. Active trade in ornamental fish poses a potential risk for spread of KHV. Recognising the significance, "infection with koi herpesvirus" has been listed under "diseases prevalent in the region" in the NACA/FAO/OIE regional quarterly aquatic animal disease (QAAD) list, effective for reporting from first quarter of 2004.

Slow growth syndrome in Penaeus monodon - an emerging problem: Disease card

This information sheet on slow growth syndrome in Penaeus monodon provides some background information on the possible aetiology and a working case definition. This will be useful for surveillance and epidemiological purposes to collate more information about this syndrome in the region.

Quarterly Aquatic Animal Disease Report, July-September 2004

This report, the 25th in the series, contains information about the aquatic animal health status of fifteen states in the Asia-Pacific region. The foreword discusses the outcomes of the third meeting of the Asia Regional Advisory Group on Aquatic Animal Health.

Aquaculture Asia Magazine, July-September 2004

In this issue:

Genetic considerations in fisheries and aquaculture with regards to biodiversity. Rice-fish culture for food and environmental security. Land-based aquaculture of spotted babylon Babylonia areolata in Thailand: Hatchery-based seedling operation. Shrimp health question and answer. Women in coastal aquaculture. Insights into live marine food fish markets in Asia. Farming practices, market chains and prices of marine finfish in Malaysia, Indonesia and Hong Kong.

Development of a Regional Research Programme on Grouper Virus Transmission and Vaccine Development

These are the proceedings of a workshop, funded by the APEC Fisheries Working Group Project 02/2000. The project developed a framework with nine major research components: Health and production at hatcheries, regional collaborative disease resource centers, regional disease monitoring and surveillance, improving regional diagnostic capabilities, responsible trans-boundary movement, farm health management, vaccines and vaccination, funding mechanisms and establishment of an ad-hoc working group.

Quarterly Aquatic Animal Disease Report, April-June 2004

This report, the 24th in the series, contains information about the aquatic animal health status of seventeen states in the Asia-Pacific region. The foreword discusses capacity building to prevent, prepare for an respond to aquatic animal health emergencies.

Emerging Trends and Experiences in Asia-Pacific Aquaculture: 2003

This document provides an overview of topical issues in Asian aquaculture for 2003, including a review of its status, progress in research and development, major issues and experiences, together with suggestions on actions for addressing opportunities and constraints. The document was prepared by NACA and FAO to facilitate discussions at the 15th NACA Governing Council meeting, hosted by the Government of Sri Lanka on 21st-25th April 2004.

Aquaculture Asia Magazine, April-June 2004

In this issue:

Genetic impacts of translocation on aquatic biodiversity in Asia. Carp culture in Iran. Opportunities and challenges in Myanmar aquaculture. Impacts of monosex Macrobrachium culture on seed availability in India. Use of new technology and skills for eco-friendly production of tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon. Larval rearing and spat production of the windowpane shell Placuna placenta. HACCP in shrimp farming. First breeding success of Napoleon wrasse Cheilinus undulatus and coral trout Plectropomus leopardus.

Recommendations of the Expert Consultation on Rapid Diagnosis of Shrimp Viral Diseases, Chennai 2002

The recommendations are derived from discussions at the consultation and three expert working groups and were adopted during the final plenary session of the Expert Consultation. Together they represent a powerful set of recommendations in use of rapid diagnostic tools for better health management in shrimp aquaculture. They have been put together in this summary document for rapid dissemination to potential users, researchers and other interested parties, in India and elsewhere.

Chemical and biological amendments used in shrimp farming (abstract)

This article compares the use of chemical and biological amendments in shrimp farming in Asia and the Americas. The information comes mainly from the author’s experience in Thailand and Ecuador, as well as from the literature. The amendments are discussed according to three major categories: (1) water and soil quality management products, (2) biocides, and (3) feed additives. Certain agents, while necessary to successful shrimp farming, should be used only when needed and in a safe and responsible manner.