Environment and sustainability

Global population is forecast to reach around 9 billion by 2050. To feed the world, global agricultural output must increase by around 60% from present levels. This must be achieved against a background of increasing competition for natural resources such as water, feed ingredients and farming sites.

Maintaining environmental integrity while massively increasing food production will require farming systems to reduce their unit production environmental footprint. Many farming practices that are regarded as sustainable today will not be acceptable when scaled up. Sustainable intensification of aquaculture means doing more with less. The Sustainable Farming Systems Programme aims to help aquaculture become a more efficient user of natural resources, both in terms of farm productivity and environmental efficiency.

The programme develops better management practices for major aquaculture farming systems, and promotes aquaculture as a secondary or additional use of water resources. The programme focusses on practical interventions that can be directly achieved by small-scale farmers in a developing country context.

Key activities

Key activities of the programme are:

  • Development of better management practices for key aquaculture production systems.
  • Organising small-scale farmers into associations to facilitate cluster-based approaches to extension.
  • Development of culture-based fisheries as a secondary use of water bodies.
  • Development of strategic policy frameworks to guide governments and development agencies in promoting sustainable intensification of aquaculture.

Creative Commons Attribution.

Related

Subject tags

A collection of subject tags relating to technical matters.

In this collection

Thematic session 1 summary and conclusions: Resources, services and technologies for future aquaculture

Presentation of the summary, conclusions and recommendations of Thematic Session 1: Resources, services and technologies for future aquaculture.

Thematic session 5 summary and conclusions: Improving knowledge, information, research, extension and communication on aquaculture

Presentation of the summary, conclusions and recommendations of Thematic Session 5 (Improving knowledge, information, research, extension and communication on aquaculture).

Thematic session 6 summary and conclusions: Enhancing the contribution of aquaculture to poverty alleviation, food security and rural development

Presentation of the summary, conclusions and recommendations of Thematic Session 6 (Enhancing the contribution of aquaculture to poverty alleviation, food security and rural development).

Presentation and discussion on the DRAFT Phuket Consensus and Strategy for Global Aquaculture Development

A presentation on the draft Phuket Consensus document as circulated with the conference papers a summary of comments that had been provided by conference participants. The presentation followed by a plenary discussion as the conference participants view the document on screen.

Phuket Consensus: A re-affirmation of commitment to the Bangkok Declaration

The Phuket Consensus is a declaration on aquaculture development endorsed by participants of the Global Conference on Aquaculture 2010, held in Phuket, Thailand, 22-25 September. The consensus builds on the Bangkok Declaration, which was formulated at the International Conference on Aquaculture in the Third Millennium, held in Bangkok, 20-25 February 2000. The consensus and declaration provide strategic guidance on sustainable development of aquaculture considering social, environmental, technical and economic issues.

Training of Trainers: Strengthening capacity of small holder ASEAN aquaculture farmers

This is the manual for the "train the trainers" course aiming to increase the capacity of small-scale farmers in ASEAN countries. The manual focusses on five countries and commodities: Snakehead (Cambodia), Tilapia (Thailand), seaweed (Philippines), marine fish (Indonesia) and shrimp (Vietnam). In this volume, lectures presented by experts are included. The training program included technical aspects related to the culture of commodities, marketing, access to information, organization of farmer groups, gender and good culture practices.

Climate change implications for fisheries and aquaculture: Overview of current scientific knowledge

An overview of the current scientific knowledge available on climate change implications for fisheries and aquaculture is provided through three technical papers that were presented and discussed during the Expert Workshop on Climate Change Implications for Fisheries and Aquaculture (Rome, 7-9 April 2008). A summary of the workshop outcomes as well as key messages on impacts of climate change on aquatic ecosystems and on fisheries- and aquaculture-based livelihoods are provided in the introduction of this technical paper.

Aquaculture Asia Magazine, October-December 2009

In this issue:

Mussel farming initiatives in North Kerala, India. Selective study on availability of indigenous fish with ornamental value in West Bengal. Aquaculture livelihoods centre in Aceh, Indonesia. e-Sagu Aqua - an innovative information and communication technology model for transfer of technology for aquaculture. Freshwater pearl crop: An emerging enterprise in the Indian subcontinent. Preliminary risk assessment of Pacific white shrimp (P. vannamei) introduced to Thailand for aquaculture. Black gill disease of lobster and more.

Technical brief: Vulnerability and adaption to climate change impacts on catfish farming in Vietnam

This brief reports on a catfish farming stakeholder workshop and focus group meeting on vulnerability and adaption to climate change held in Can Tho, Vietnam. Stakeholders including catfish farmers in general expressed that climate change is a serious threat, having observed shifts in climatic patterns, saline water intrusion and frequent typhoons. Suggestions to reduce on-farm risks included producing quality fry, developing new culture systems, elevating dykes, livelihood diversification, awareness workshops and financial support to farmers.

Policy brief: Fisheries and aquaculture in a changing climate

Climate change impacts such as more frequent and severe floods and droughts will affect the food and water security of many people. The impact of climate change on aquatic ecosystems, fisheries and aquaculture, however, is not as well known. This policy brief, a joint partnership between several agencies, highlights this issue to ensure that decision makers and climate change negotiators consider aquatic ecosystems, fisheries and aquaculture at the UNFCCC COP-15 in Copenhagen, December 2009.