India

India's involvement in NACA.

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NACA member governments

NACA member governments are: Australia, Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, Hong Kong SAR, India, Indonesia, I.R. Iran, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Korea (DPR), Lao PDR, Malaysia, Maldives, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Vietnam.

In this collection

Expert Workshop on Aquaculture Effluent Management held in Bangkok

In 2023, FAO and NACA initiated a consultation process on aquaculture effluent management in Asia and the Pacific in collaboration with NACA member governments. Experts across the region gathered information to assess the state of governance, advancements in technology and innovation in aquaculture effluent management. The consultative process culminated in an expert workshop, convened from 14 to 15 November, funded by FAO, to share views and national experiences on aquaculture effluent management.

Aquaculture Asia Magazine, October-December 2023

In this issue:

  • How welfare assessments of farmed white leg shrimp (Penaeus vannamei) can benefit the whole industry
  • Thai Fish Project: A path towards a sustainable aquaculture
  • Nationally-recognised ornamental fish breeder Kripan Sarkar - a man to remember
  • Tilapia parvovirus disease: An emerging threat for the tilapia aquaculture industry
  • Naihati fish seed market as state-of-the-art for sustainable support services to fish growers, buyers and traders
  • NACA Newsletter

Naihati fish seed market as state-of-the-art for sustainable support services to fish growers, buyers and traders

Naihati fish seed market of West Bengal was established in 1976 and is the largest seed market in India. With the advent of induced breeding technology and hatcheries, fish seed is now available almost year-round, catering to the need of Indian farmers. Situated in North 24 Parganas, Naihati wholesale fish seed market is a well-known establishment that provides multifaceted services to stakeholders including fish seed growers, retailers, sellers, and mediators. This article describes the state of the market as aspects of its evolution over time.

Tilapia parvovirus disease: An emerging threat for the tilapia aquaculture industry

In late 2022 tilapia parvovirus (TiPV) was found to be associated with mass mortalities of tilapia in Odisha, India, both individually and in co-infections with tilapia lake virus. Infections have also been reported from Thailand and China. Clinical signs include lethargy, scale loss, redness on the body with haemorrhages on the operculum, base of fins and ventral part, opaqueness of the eyes, swimming near the pond edge and loss of appetite before death. This article describes the epidemiology of TiPV disease including its diagnosis, transmission, prevention and control, and its potential impact on the tilapia aquaculture industry.

Nationally-recognised ornamental fish breeder Kripan Sarkar - a man to remember

The Late Sri Kripan Sarkar was an enterprising ornamental fish breeder-cum-farmer par excellence, exporter and supplier of the same from northern part of West Bengal. As proprietor of Rainbow Ornamental Fish Farm, at Bakshipara Village in Jalpaiguri District, he was an expert and authority in scientific breeding, larval rearing, propagation, research and experimentation on economically important freshwater ornamental fishes. There was a time when Sri Sarkar was the only commercial ornamental fish breeder in north Bengal. This article documents his experiences and career as an influential pioneer in the ornamental fish culture trade.

Reported Aquatic Animal Diseases in the Asia-Pacific Region during the Second Quarter of 2023

With the implementation of the new aquatic animal disease reporting in the Asia Pacific region from January 2021, and in lieu of the published QAAD Reports (last issue published was 4th quarter of 2020), NACA is publishing reported aquatic animal diseases submitted by countries in the Asia-Pacific region. This report covers the second quarter of 2023 and the original and updated reports can be accessed from the QAAD page

Genetic management of Indian major carps

Collectively carps represent the largest global aquaculture sector, contributing over 20 percent of global aquaculture production. The Indian major carps including catla (Catla catla), rohu (Labeo rohita) and mrigal (Cirhinnus mrigala) are cultured widely across the Indian sub-continent with the main culture system being a multi-species polyculture in ponds, often including other carp species. This production sector is supported by major seed supply systems producing over 50 billion seed per annum. This case study analyses genetic management of Indian major carps since they were first domesticated with the development of hypophysation techniques in the 1950s. A review of literature and a survey of common hatchery practices identifies significant problems prevalent in the sector brought about by a lack of application of best practices in genetic management resulting in loss of genetic diversity, inbreeding and uncontrolled hybrid introgression.

Training course on Risk Analysis in the Aquaculture Value Chain held in Bangkok

Risk analysis is an essential component of a national aquatic organism health strategy. Now widely applied in many fields, risk analysis provides a science-based framework for evaluating hazards, determining the likelihood and extent of potential harms, mitigating risks and guiding policy decisions. Combining risk and value chain analysis provides a risk-based and people-centred approach to managing disease risks and planning control measures for aquaculture systems. FAO organised a training course on Risk Analysis in the Value Chain from 3-5 September in Bangkok, Thailand, in partnership with NACA, INFOFISH, Thailand Department of Fisheries and the ASEAN Network of Aquatic Animal Health Centres. Financial support was provided by the Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation and Thailand Department of Fisheries.

Aquaculture Asia Magazine, July-September 2023

In this issue:

  • Pathway to aquaculture biosecurity: Mitigating risks, managing progressively and engaging the value chain
  • Important considerations for feed and feeding management during Indian catfish culture
  • A transitional journey from fisheries to aquaculture in Moyna
  • Colour widow tetra: A new and highly preferred aquarium fish in West Bengal
  • Expanding the horizon of aquaculture through women's empowerment
  • NACA Newsletter

Expanding the horizon of aquaculture through women's empowerment

The concept of “empowerment” was introduced at the International Women’s conference in 1985 at Nairobi, which defined empowerment as a “redistribution of social power and control of resources in favour of women”. In recent years the development of women has emphasised providing equal opportunities to women by removing gender bias, empowering, and creating self-reliance among them. Empowerment of women and gender equality is recognised globally as a key element to achieve progress in all areas. Globally, the role of women and the need to consider gender issues in aquaculture development was first recognised by the FAO-NORAD sponsored workshop on “Women in Aquaculture” in 1987.