Despite their abundance at one time in India and other Asian nations, wild mahseer populations have been declining because of degradation of aquatic ecosystems, urbanisation and indiscriminate fishing. Wild mahseer are populations are presently struggling for their mere existence.

An international workshop on mahseer conservation, propagation and rehabilitation will be held in Bhimtal, India from 23-24 April 2018. The workshop is organised by the ICAR-Directorate of Coldwater Fisheries Research in collaboration with the Coldwater Fisheries Society of India.

BRAQCON 2019 wil cover latest research and development in the broader themes of the conference in the form of special sessions, contributed papers, expert group discussions and brainstorming on issues facing aquaculturists and ecosystem managers in India and around the world. The conference themes include: Brackishwater ecosystems, estuarine biodiversity and conservation; aquaculture production systems; larviculture; fish and shellfish nutrition; environment and climate change; aquatic animal health; socio-economic and livelihood issues; and aquaculture genetics and biotechnology.

This collection contains video recordings of the lectures from the Regional Training Course on Culture-based Fisheries in Inland Waters, held at Nha Trang University, Vietnam. The objective of the course was to provide participants with the skills to assist local communities to plan and manage culture-based fisheries; a relatively simple and low cost technology that can deliver nutritional and economic benefits to rural communities with few livelihood options. The course was sponsored by the United Nations University Fisheries Training Programme.

Better management practices for stocking and transport of seed for culture-based fisheries.

The first ever Regional Training Course on Culture-based Fisheries in Inland Waters was held at Nha Trang University from 30 October to 8 November. The objective of the course was to provide participants with the skills to assist local communities to plan and manage culture-based fisheries. These practices are an example of a relatively simple and low cost technology that can deliver nutritional and economic benefits to rural communities, which often have few livelihood options.

Among the freshwater catfishes, magur (Clarias batrachus) is in great demand in eastern and north-eastern India; it is revered as highly nutritious and therapeutic in nature. During May-June 2016, Sri Sayer Mohammad Sarkar, an experienced magur breeder and seed producer, has achieved success in producing induced-bred hybrid seed of Heteropneustes fossilis and Clarias batrachus. His breeding protocol and experiences in nursery and growout of hybrid catfish are shared in this article.

The potential for augmentation of fish production and fish-based eco-tourism in Arunachal Pradesh are immense. The landscape of the state is characterised by lofty mountains with snow-clad peaks, dense forests, turbulent streams and a rich diversity of flora and fauna. We review the potential of some of the lakes in the region to support trout fisheries for both recreational fishing and eco-tourism, with a view to providing job opportunities for highland communities.

The Asian Institute of Technology (AIT) is launching a new Certificate programme on Sustainable Asian Aquaculture via the AARM Academic programme, for one semester beginning August 2017. This certificate programme is a combination of well-designed course work and hands-on experience in specialised areas (fish/shrimp hatchery or farming). The programme is useful for both students (with credit transfer) and for working professionals and entrepreneurs (without credits).

In this issue:

Inspiring story of aquaculture in Sikkim - a journey from conservation to farming; farming of scampi and tiger shrimp together - a case study from West Bengal; Labeo pangusia - a candidate for diversification of hill aquaculture; sustainability of an integrated livestock-fish-crop farming system as a small scale enterprise; sustainable coastal aquaculture in India; potential scope and prospects of domestic fish market in Chhattisgarh.

Labeo pangusia is a highly prized hill stream carp found mainly in the deeper pools of upland streams. Heavy fishing pressure has led to depletion of wild populations in recent years and the species is likely to become threatened if a conservation strategy is not developed. We report on an investigation into the reproductive biology of this species and on the result of successful induced breeding trials.