In this issue:

New reviews of aquaculture now available online; Post-doctoral scholarships for women in STEM at the University of Stirling; Research breakthrough seen to curb shortage of "poor man's fish"; Free online aquaculture courses; Fishing for life 2022: South and South-East Asian Conference on Small Scale Fisheries and Aquaculture; Reported Aquatic Animal Diseases in the Asia-Pacific Region during the Third Quarter of 2021; Shrimp 2022: INFOFISH World Shrimp Trade Conference and Exhibition; Tuskfish CMS v2.0.3 available.

A scientific breakthrough at a research center in the Philippines might finally be the long-term solution to the perennial shortage of round scad (Decapterus spp.), known as the “poor man’s fish” in the country. In a world’s first, researchers successfully spawned the round scad Decapterus macrosoma in captivity at the Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center, Aquaculture Department (SEAFDEC/AQD) in Tigbauan, Iloilo, marking a critical milestone towards farming the fish, locally known as galunggong. Round scad is considered a staple fish in the Philippines with over 202,000 metric tons harvested by commercial and municipal fisheries in 2020 according to government statistics.

The University of Stirling has been awarded funds by the British Council to provide funding for four Early Academic Fellowships for Women in STEM. These fellowships will be 6-12 months in duration. The scholarships are available to women who are passport holders and permanent residents of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal and Sri Lanka. For further information please visit the University of Stirling website. The deadline for submissions is 31 March 2022.

We are pleased to announce that the FAO Reviews of Aquaculture have been published online at the FAO website, including the six Regional Reviews and a Global Synthesis, which were developed and published in conjunction with the Global Conference on Aquaculture Millennium +20 (GCA+20). The publications are linked below. Video presentations of the reviews, including expert panel discussions and question and answer sessions, are also available from the GCA+20 website.

Shanghai Ocean University is offering PhD scholarships for the majors of Aquaculture, Hydrobiology, Fishery Economics and Management, Fishery Resources Management and Fishery Environment Protection and Management. The scholarship program is open to international candidates under 35 years old who have a master’s degree with a good academic record and outstanding research potential. The scholarships include a full tuition fee waiver, accommodation, living allowance and medical insurance. Applicants are highly recommended to submit the application before March 30, 2022. The final application deadline is April 15, 2022.

In this issue:

Exploration of canal resources as a potential source for fish production in the Indian Sundarbans; Expansion of new host range of isopod Tachaea spongillicola infestation to fish species could pose a risk to aquaculture food industry in southeast Asian countries; Aspects of air-breathing fish farming practiced at Mathurapur-II Block, West Bengal, India; Magical role of live foods in boosting spawn survival of climbing perch: A success in the farmer’s field; NACA Newsletter.

Climbing perch inhabit water bodies ranging from fresh to brackish waters across a wide range of environments, and are widely distributed throughout south and southeast Asia through to southern China. In India it is prized both as a foodfish and as a traditional medicinal food. This article describes the induced breeding of climbing perch and the interaction of scientists and farmers to improve survival of larvae and fry in through the use of live feeds (rotifer) in small-scale hatcheries in India.

Climbing perch Anabas testudineus is a high-priced fish, nutritious and economically profitable for small- to medium-scale fish farmers, who can obtain fry from local paddy fields and low-lying inundated areas in late summer, monsoon and post-monsoon periods. Climbing perch is a facultative air-breathing fish that is able to move between water bodies by undertaking short migrations overland. This article describes techniques for climbing perch and major carp aquaculture, including use of biofloc systems, preparation of live feeds including mealworms, and some concerns regarding the hybridisation of native Indian strain of A. testudineus with an imported Vietnamese strain.

Our article in the journal Aquaculture highlighted the first record of the isopod Tachaea spongillicola infesting wild fish species of aquaculture importance, particularly of carps. T. spongillicola was first recorded in freshwater sponges, 114 years ago and later recorded infesting freshwater prawns. Our recent study has further recorded infestation of this isopod in wild fish species. The expansion of host range from freshwater sponges to freshwater prawns and now to freshwater fish could pose a risk to aquatic industries in the years to come. We hypothesise that climate change could be a major factor contributing towards the expansion of the host range of parasites.

Fisheries is next to agriculture in offering employment opportunities for poor rural communities in Sundarbans. With around 17 million hectares of canals in India, there is considerable potential to generate jobs and improve the food security of rural populations if canals can be used for aquaculture production. This study explored the feasibility of aquaculture as a secondary use of canal infrastructure through use of net barrier partitions, installed and managed by local communities.