A presentation on assessment of the suitability of water bodies for culture-based fisheries development.

A presentation on the current state of culture-based fisheries practices in China.

The first ever Regional Training Course on Culture-based Fisheries in Inland Waters was held at Nha Trang University from 30 October to 8 November. The objective of the course was to provide participants with the skills to assist local communities to plan and manage culture-based fisheries. These practices are an example of a relatively simple and low cost technology that can deliver nutritional and economic benefits to rural communities, which often have few livelihood options.

A regional consultation on aquaculture feed production and use in Asia-Pacific was held from 7-9 March 2017. The consultation reviewed the current situation of aquaculture feed production and use, sourcing of ingredients, policy and research needs. This collection contains audio recordings of the technical presentations made by experts, international organisations, the private sector and governments in the region. The report of the consultation is in press and will be made available for download in due course.

In this issue:

Inspiring story of aquaculture in Sikkim - a journey from conservation to farming; farming of scampi and tiger shrimp together - a case study from West Bengal; Labeo pangusia - a candidate for diversification of hill aquaculture; sustainability of an integrated livestock-fish-crop farming system as a small scale enterprise; sustainable coastal aquaculture in India; potential scope and prospects of domestic fish market in Chhattisgarh.

We examined the sustainability and economic viability of a model integrated livestock-fish-crop farming system developed by the Fisheries Research Centre, Assam Agricultural University, over an extended period of 13 years. The system was developed as an ecologically sustainable alternative technology for small and margin farmers. It incorporates two livestock components, pig and poultry, with horticulture and carp polyculture. Analysis of cash flow and benefit-cost ration revealed the system to be economically sustainable over the long term.

Feed is the most expensive component of an aquaculture enterprise. Successful cultured fish production requires optimisation of feeding practices to ensure the most economically effective growth rates. Reducing feed costs for culture practices can be achieved by taking the advantage of restricted feeding strategies. Under a restricted feeding regime fish convert a greater portion of feed to body weight. Case studies of restricted feeding are presented for several species and the costs savings and other benefits are briefly discussed.

In Nepal, low quality and seasonal access to fish seed is an important restriction on the development of the aquaculture sector. Commercialisation of fish farming cannot progress rapidly in the absence of critical inputs and a regular supply of quality fish seed is an integral requirement for the transition of fish farming from a subsistence activity to a commercial enterprise. Participatory market chain approaches are a key tool for the social and economic improvement of farmers and market participants.

FAO, NACA and the Thai Department of Fisheries convened a Regional Consultation Responsible Production and Use of Feed and Feed Ingredients for Sustainable Growth of Aquaculture in Asia-Pacific in Bangkok, 7-9 March 2017. The objective of the consultation was to review the current status of aquaculture feed production and use, demand and supply, sourcing of ingredients, government policies and institutional support, ongoing progress and development gaps. The meeting brought together government and private sector representatives.

The objective of this manual was to provide basic guidelines for the hatchery production of Pa Phia (Labeo chrysophekadion) fingerlings. It includes information on managing and spawning broodstock, genetic guidelines, egg incubation, hatching larviculture and fry rearing. Although the guidelines were specifically developed for production of Pa Phia at government hatcheries in the Lao PDR, they may be applied to other, related, species and could be adopted and commercialised by the private sector hatcheries