We examined the sustainability and economic viability of a model integrated livestock-fish-crop farming system developed by the Fisheries Research Centre, Assam Agricultural University, over an extended period of 13 years. The system was developed as an ecologically sustainable alternative technology for small and margin farmers. It incorporates two livestock components, pig and poultry, with horticulture and carp polyculture. Analysis of cash flow and benefit-cost ration revealed the system to be economically sustainable over the long term.

Feed is the most expensive component of an aquaculture enterprise. Successful cultured fish production requires optimisation of feeding practices to ensure the most economically effective growth rates. Reducing feed costs for culture practices can be achieved by taking the advantage of restricted feeding strategies. Under a restricted feeding regime fish convert a greater portion of feed to body weight. Case studies of restricted feeding are presented for several species and the costs savings and other benefits are briefly discussed.

In Nepal, low quality and seasonal access to fish seed is an important restriction on the development of the aquaculture sector. Commercialisation of fish farming cannot progress rapidly in the absence of critical inputs and a regular supply of quality fish seed is an integral requirement for the transition of fish farming from a subsistence activity to a commercial enterprise. Participatory market chain approaches are a key tool for the social and economic improvement of farmers and market participants.

FAO, NACA and the Thai Department of Fisheries convened a Regional Consultation Responsible Production and Use of Feed and Feed Ingredients for Sustainable Growth of Aquaculture in Asia-Pacific in Bangkok, 7-9 March 2017. The objective of the consultation was to review the current status of aquaculture feed production and use, demand and supply, sourcing of ingredients, government policies and institutional support, ongoing progress and development gaps. The meeting brought together government and private sector representatives.

The objective of this manual was to provide basic guidelines for the hatchery production of Pa Phia (Labeo chrysophekadion) fingerlings. It includes information on managing and spawning broodstock, genetic guidelines, egg incubation, hatching larviculture and fry rearing. Although the guidelines were specifically developed for production of Pa Phia at government hatcheries in the Lao PDR, they may be applied to other, related, species and could be adopted and commercialised by the private sector hatcheries

This Code of Practice is prepared to promote or ensure compliance to World Trade Organisation-Sanitary and Phytosanitary measures for the movement of live aquatic organisms in the Lower Mekong Basin. The goals of the Code are to achieve environmental protection and management, biodiversity conservation as well as prevention of spread of disease epizootics. Most of the points listed in this Code are based on the inputs of MRC Member Countries.

This publication is the major output of a regional programme jointly implemented by FAO and NACA in 2015 to document and disseminate successful practices that contribute to the sustainable intensification of aquaculture in the Asia-Pacific region. Twelve practices are described that contribute to at least one of the following: Improved production and resource use efficiency (land, water, feed, energy); improved environmental benefits; strengthened economic viability and farmers' resilience; and improved social acceptance and equity.

The workshop was held in Bali, Indonesia from 6 to 8 November 2013. The programme included reports on current aquatic animal disease situations in selected countries and presentations on the national aquatic animal health programmes of China, Japan and Korea. In addition, case studies on the molluscan diseases, shrimp diseases and finfish diseases were presented to facilitate the subsequent discussion on emergency response of those diseases in the national and regional level.

Small aquaculture farm holders are experiencing some drastic changes, the shift from household consumption focused subsistent production to market oriented commercial production and external environment changes such as tightening governance on environment impacts control and resource allocation and increasingly stringent standard for food safety and quality. To adapt to the changes, the small-scale farmers need to intensify, diversify and commercialise production, which requires better management.

Practices and people can be considered as two key ingredients to responsible aquaculture. Practices that are in conformity with national and international standards and requirements, ensure sustainability of the sector, ensure environment protection and integrity, enable social equity and respect ethical values and standards, consider human food safety concerns seriously and people who; are well informed, willing to change and ready to embrace practices for public good.