The 78th edition of the Quarterly Aquatic Animal Disease Report contains information from twelve governments in the Asia-Pacific region. The foreword discusses three recent aquatic animal health consultations: The ASEAN Regional Technical Consultation on Aquatic Emergency Preparedness and Response Systems for Effective Management of Transboundary Disease Outbreaks in Southeast Asia; the Regional Consultation and Related Study on Antimicrobial Resistance Risk to Aquaculture in Asia; and the Preliminary Consultation on Monitoring of Antimicrobial Resistance in Bacterial Pathogens in Aquaculture.

In this issue:

Concept of seed production of Heteropneustes fossilis in farmers' fields in West Bengal, India; Fishing gear and practices in flood waters of Assam; Fisherwomen empowerment: Shedding light on the invisible gender; Integrated multi-trophic aquaculture systems: A solution of sustainability.

Marine aquaculture of high value species such as fish is generally reliant on external food supplies and has a negative impact on water quality, generating high organic and nutrient loadings. Integrated multi-trophic aquaculture offers a solution to reduce environmental impact of farming systems, culturing complimentary species that can recycle nutrients and reduce nutrient pollution while generating additional products for sale. This article looks at species selection and integration of trophic levels in system design.

The 77th edition of the Quarterly Aquatic Animal Disease Report contains information from nine governments. The foreword discusses an intensive seven-day training course on tilapia lake virus (TiLV) that was jointly organised by China's National Fisheries Extension Center, Sun Yat-Sen University and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

This short research note provides insights on the invasive apple snails (Pomacea spp.) and rice cultivation in Brunei Darussalam. This freshwater invasive snail was first detected in 2009, but it was never introduced intentionally. Since then their population has increased swiftly and spread to almost all the rice areas across the country, becoming a major pest of irrigated transplanted rice. Research and collaboration among infested countries is important for accurate species identification and better understanding of the invasion pathways.

The 76th edition of the Quarterly Aquatic Animal Disease Report contains information from 14 governments. The foreword discusses the outcomes of a Stakeholder Consultation on Progressive Management Pathway to Improve Aquaculture Biosecurity, organised by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Mississippi State University and the World Bank.

This report summarises the proceedings of the 16th meeting of the Advisory Group, held 26-27 August 2017 in Bali, Indonesia. The group's role includes reviewing disease trends and emerging threats in the region, identifying developments in global aquatic disease issues and standards, evaluating the Quarterly Aquatic Animal Disease Reporting Programme and providing guidance on regional strategies to improve aquatic animal health management. The meeting included discussion on Tilapia Lake Virus (TiLV) and developments in antimicrobial resistance.

Integrated multi-trophic aquaculture is a flexible concept, on which many variations can be developed and should not be viewed as confined to open-water, marine systems. Freshwater integrated multi-trophic aquaculture, perhaps better known as aquaponics, applies the same principles as those used in marine integrated multi-trophic systems. In particular, using plants to reduce phosphorus (and other nutrient) levels in effluents can help farmers meet water quality guidelines and prevent eutrophication in the environment.

In this issue:

Invasive apple snails (Pomacea spp.) in Vietnam: Short review; A review of fresh water integrated multi-trophic aquaculture: Catching up on the dream of a blue revolution in India; Pre-pupae (larvae) of black soldier fly - a potential alternate protein source for aquaculture feeds; Penaeid shrimp and giant prawn seed collection from Rupnarayan River in Purba Medinipur, West Bengal, India; NACA Newsletter; First training course on culture-based fisheries held in Nha Trang, Vietnam.

Apple snails have become a major pest of wetland rice in much of Southeast Asia. Two species are involved, Pomacea canaliculata and P. maculata. One or both of these species have become widely established not only in many parts of Southeast Asia but also in other parts of the world. This book provides an update on research into the biology, management and use of apple snails and highlights the need to prevent further spread of these species.