Hypselobarbus pulchellus is endemic to the peninsular rivers of India, mainly the Krishna, Godavari, Tungabhadra, Sita and Tunga. It once formed a major fishery of the Tungabhadra reservoir but has declined to the status of a critically endangered species. H. pulchellus is a bentho-pelagic species which inhabits the deeper part of large streams and rivers along the base of ghats. It is the only indigenous fish that consumes aquatic weeds and submerged grasses, and could play a role in controlling aquatic vegetation in reservoirs, tanks and irrigation canals. Capable of attaining 8 kg, H. pulchellus would make a welcome addition to pond culture practices of India, especially for composite fish culture. This article gives an overview of the breeding and seed production technologies developed by ICAR-CIFA for farm-bred and pond-raised H. pulchelllus.

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Aquaculture Asia Magazine, October-December 2020

In this issue:

Framework for participatory linkage of marine ornamentals germplasm conservation to livelihoods: Is community aquaculture an inclusive option? Induced breeding of farm-bred and pond-raised critically endangered peninsular carp, Hypselobarbus pulchellus; A way forward for utilisation of aquatic genetic resources in Asia-Pacific: Synthesis from deliberations during the Regional Workshop on Underutilized Fish and Marine Genetic Resources and their Amelioration 2019; Cast nets: The dominant active fishing gear in the Kashmir Valley; Moyna model of major carp farming in Purba Medinipur District, West Bengal, India; NACA Newsletter.