Health and welfare

The Aquatic Animal Health Programme assists members to reduce the risks of aquatic animal disease impacting the livelihoods of farmers, national economies, trade, environment and human health by:

  • Improving regional cooperation in aquatic animal health and welfare.
  • Developing and implementing national strategies on aquatic animal health.
  • Improving surveillance, reporting and response to disease emergencies.
  • Promoting harmonisation of diagnostic procedures and risk assessment.
  • Widespread promotion of better aquatic animal health management practices at the farm level.

Key activities

Key activities of the programme include:

  • Convening the annual meeting of the Asia Regional Advisory Group on Aquatic Animal Health, coordinating the Quarterly Aquatic Animal Disease Report and bringing regional issues to the attention of global standard setting bodies such as the Office International des Epizooties.
  • Establishment and expansion of a three-tier shared resource in aquatic animal health.
  • Development of farm-level health management tools for key aquaculture commodities.
  • Supporting regional disease surveillance and reporting.
  • Strengthening aquatic animal health and biosecurity in the region.
  • Facilitating harmonisation in disease diagnostic techniques.
  • Developing resource material in support of diagnosis and surveillance.

Contacts

Creative Commons Attribution.

Related

Subject tags

A collection of subject tags relating to technical matters.

In this collection

NACA Newsletter Volume XX, No. 1, January-March 2005

In this issue:

Tsunami: The long road to recovery. Special Program in Response to the Tsunami. Rebuilding cage aquaculture and eco-tourism at Koh Yao Noi, Thailand. Cash for work, Aceh Indonesia. Assessment of tsunami impacts in Thailand and Indonesia. Consortium to Restore Shattered Livelihoods in Tsunami-devastated Nations. Regional Workshop on Rehabilitation of Fisheries and Aquaculture in Coastal Communities of tsunami affected countries in Asia. Outcomes of Governing Council 16. New grouper feed and marine finfish hatchery guides. Towards a framework for a pro-poor regional strategy for sustainable aquatic resources management in Asia-Pacific. Artificial propagation of indigenous fish species in Sarawak, Malaysia. Inauguration of the National Advisory Committee on Aquatic Animal Health of Viet Nam. Supporting Viet Nam to make an informed decision towards Penaeus vannamei farming. Health group calls for improved surveillance and reporting. Training and study tours in Q1 2005-05-25. TVR 'Ramu' Pillay (1921-2005).

Abalone viral mortality: Disease card

Recognising the importance of abalone viral mortality, in terms of its potential to spread and cause economic loss, "abalone viral mortality" was included for listing in the regional NACA/FAO/OIE quarterly aquatic animal disease (QAAD) reporting list under "unknown diseases of serious nature" effective first quarter of 2004. This disease card is developed to provide information to national authorities and support the regional QAAD reporting system.

Haemorrhagic disease of grass carp: Disease card

Hemorrhagic disease of grass carp is a serious viral disease affecting grass carp fingerlings. The disease has the potential to spread and cause serious economic loss in countries of the region. This disease card is developed to raise awareness and support surveillance efforts of countries in the region.

Aquaculture Development Beyond 2000: The Bangkok Declaration and Strategy

The main output of the International Conference on Aquaculture in the Third Millennium. The Declaration summarises the key impediments and opportunities in aquaculture development that are likely to arise over the next 20 years and provides strategic policy guidance for sustainable aquaculture development. The Declaration was adopted by conference participants in a plenary session.

Quarterly Aquatic Animal Disease Report, October-December 2004

This report, the 26th in the series, contains information about the aquatic animal health status of fifteen states in the Asia-Pacific region. The foreword discusses responsible movement of live aquatic animals in the context of health and quarantine issues.

Aquaculture Asia Magazine, October-December 2004

In this issue:

Captive breeding of vulnerable Indian carp Cirrhinus reba for conservation. Conservation of the Asiatic catfish Clarias batrachus through artificial propagation. A perspective on breeding and genetics of walking catfish in Thailand. Decline of wastewater-fed aquaculture in Hanoi. Artificial propagation of indigenous Tor species in Malaysia. Aquaculture of spotted babylon Babylonia areolata. First successful hatchery production of Napoleon wrasse Cheilinus undulatus. Trade and market trends in the live reef fish trade.

NACA Newsletter Volume XIX, No. 4, October-December 2004

In this issue:

Kasetsart University and NACA sign MOU on genetics. Village shrimp health management project in Andhra Pradesh. A committee to manage fish health in Viet Nam. China to promote healthy shrimp farming. Father of China's shrimp aquaculture. NACA collaboration can extend to west and central Asia, Iran mission suggests. STREAM conducts monitoring & evaluation workshop. STREAM to support aquaculture in western Orissa.

Akoya oyster disease: Disease card

Akoya oyster disease is of concern to the region and was included in the Regional NACA/FAO/OIE quarterly aquatic animal disease (QAAD) reporting list, effective first quarter of 2003, to assist in the collection of occurrence data. This disease card will support the surveillance programs of countries in the Asia-Pacific region.

Introductions and movement of Penaeus vannamei and Penaeus stylirostris in Asia and the Pacific

This report has attempted to gather all of the currently available data on the extent of P. vannamei and P. stylirostris importation and culture in Asia, its potential problems and benefits, to provide a source document from which to investigate further the means by which control over this issue might be re-established. Recommendations aimed at controlling the importation, testing and culture of these species have been made for all levels and are included in this report.

Epizootic ulcerative syndrome: Disease card

Epizootic ulcerative syndrome (EUS) is a seasonal epizootic condition of wild and farmed, fresh and brackishwater fish. Of complex infectious aetiology, it is characterised by the presence of invasive Aphanomyces infection and necrotising ulcerative lesions typically producing a granulomatous response. The disease is now endemic in South-east and south Asia, and has recently extended to West Asia. EUS is indistinguishable from red spot disease of eastern Australia and mycotic granulomatosis of Japan.