Inland aquaculture

Information relating to inland aquaculture practices.

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A collection of subject tags relating to technical matters.

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Aquaculture Asia Magazine, July-September 2021

In this issue:

Opinion: Benefits of animal welfare in Indian aquaculture; Imparting skill on formulated fish feed preparation to women’s self-help groups in villages – an experience; Farming of the anadromous shad, Tenualosa ilisha: Signs of taking off in India; Some facts on cannibalism in Wallago attu and its management during captive seed production; NACA Newsletter.

Farming of the anadromous shad, Tenualosa ilisha: Signs of taking off in India

The andadromous shad Tenualosa ilisha (also known as hilsa) is an economically important food fish in south and southeast Asia. Populations of the species are declining globally, largely due to overexploitation and habitat modification. Its fishery has drastically declined in the Bay of Bengal bordering India. Considering the excessive demand and very high market price there have been efforts for domestication and farming of the species in India. Early efforts were not measurably successful. However, momentum on developing captive breeding and farming technologies for this species has been re-invigorated with research funding from the Indian Council of Agricultural Research.

Global Conference on Aquaculture Millennium +20

The GCA +20 was successfully held as a hybrid event from 22-25 September, with physical participation at the venue in Shanghai, China, and international participation via video conference. A total of 1,728 people participated in the event, of which 500 were physically present in Shanghai. A key output from the GCA +20, the Shanghai Declaration is a call to action that highlights the principles and strategic pathways to maximise the contribution of sustainable aquaculture in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals, with a special focus on “Leaving no one behind”.

Aquaculture Asia Magazine, April-June 2021

In this issue:

Integrated taxonomy, conservation and sustainable development: Multiple facets of biodiversity; A note on 100th birth anniversary of the late Dr Hiralal Chaudhuri; Aquaculture field schools supporting mangroves for climate change adaptation of Indonesian milkfish-shrimp farmers; An insight to red tilapia breeding and culture: A farmer advisory; Aquaculture for livelihoods and food security in North-western India; NACA Newsletter.

Aquaculture for livelihoods and food security in North-western India

In the north-western states of India there is great scope for aquaculture to generate employment opportunities, improve the socio-economic status of farming communities, furnish additional food and nutritional security and boost the national economy. This article describes the present state of Indian aquaculture and prospects for increasing production through diversification, use of village/community ponds and inland saline aquaculture of shrimp and other species, along with major concerns and action plans.

Webinar: Culture-based fisheries for rural development

Join us on 31 May for a free webinar on Culture-based fisheries for rural development, with leading experts from the Asian region. Culture-based fisheries (CBF) are practices to enhance fish stocks in waters that don't have enough natural recruitment to sustain a fishery. CBF practices are usually applied in small water bodies such as village dams and irrigation reservoirs. Fish growth is driven by the natural productivity of the waters, foraging on natural food supplies. The simplicity and low capital requirements of CBF make it easy for farming communities to learn and adopt.

Concept of indigenous recirculatory aquaculture systems executed in West Bengal, India and other places

In pursuit of modernising fish culture practices, novel recirculatory aquaculture systems (RAS) have been introduced in semi-urban areas of West Bengal and other parts of India. While quite a few progressive fish farmers in India have adopted advanced, intensive and imported RAS systems featuring huge plant, other farmers have developed small and indigenous RAS systems that require comparatively low investment. This article discusses the design, principles, state-of-the-art and associated practical aspects of indigenous RAS technology as currently practiced in West Bengal and other places.

Lovesome chum of the aquarium are wreaking havoc in the East Kolkata Wetlands, India

Loricariid catfish species of the genus Pterygoplichthys, known in the aquarium trade as 'plecos' and 'algae eaters', have extensively invaded and proliferated in the East Kolkata Wetlands in West Bengal. Loricariids have capacity to alter the ecosystem and biodiversity of invasion sites, by physically altering the invaded habitats and by competing with native animals for food and space. The aquarium trade pathway is the most significant source of loricariid introductions globally. This article discusses the invasion of loricariid catfish in the East Kolkata Wetlands, and the environmental and economic impact on local fishers.

Aquaculture Asia Magazine, April-June 2020

In this issue:

Potential new species in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia: Sabaki tilapia (Oreochromis spilurus); Role of fish & fisheries in national nutrition of Pakistan; Success story of first fish farmer in India to be awarded ‘Padma Shri’; Insights into the fishing gear and ichthyofauna of major lentic water bodies of Kashmir Valley; NACA Newsletter.

Potential new species in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia: Sabaki tilapia (Oreochromis spilurus)

For the sustainable economic development of Saudi Arabia, the government set up the goals of Vision 2030. In 2030, the Saudi aquaculture industries expect to produce a combined 600,000 tonnes. At present, the total aquaculture production of Saudi Arabia is around 55,000 tonnes. To match the production goal, we need to find some new species to farm. Candidate species should be unique, easy to manage, low cost and have high market demand. The fisheries authority has chosen Sabaki tilapia (Oreochromis spilurus) to be our promotional species. This article describes efforts to establish Sabaki tilapia aquaculture operations in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.