Aquaculture Asia Magazine, January-March 2022

In this issue:

  • Exploration of canal resources as a potential source for fish production in the Indian Sundarbans
    Archana Sinha, Aparna Roy, Pranab Gogoi, Tasso Tayung, Mitesh. H. Ramteke, Arunava Mitra, Subhendu Mondal and Basanta Kumar Das
  • Expansion of new host range of isopod Tachaea spongillicola infestation to fish species could pose a risk to aquaculture food industry in southeast Asian countries
    Amiya Kumar Sahoo, Dharmendra Kumar Meena, Basanta Kumar Das
  • Aspects of air-breathing fish farming practiced at Mathurapur-II Block, West Bengal, India
    Subrato Ghosh and Pulakesh Purkait
  • Magical role of live foods in boosting spawn survival of climbing perch: A success in the farmer’s field
    D.N. Chattopadhyay, S. Adhikari, B.N. Paul, R.N. Mandal, G.S. Saha, B.R. Pillai and S.K. Swain
  • NACA Newsletter

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Aquaculture Asia Magazine

Aquaculture Asia Magazine is an autonomous publication that gives farmers and scientists in developing countries a voice. Stories concern the small-scale aquaculture prevalent in the region and the circumstances of farmers trying to make ends meet in an increasingly globalised world. We accept articles on any aspect of aquaculture and the related processing, marketing, economic, environmental and social issues. An RSS feed is available if you wish to stay informed of new issues.

In this collection

Magical role of live foods in boosting spawn survival of climbing perch: A success in the farmer’s field

Climbing perch inhabit water bodies ranging from fresh to brackish waters across a wide range of environments, and are widely distributed throughout south and southeast Asia through to southern China. In India it is prized both as a foodfish and as a traditional medicinal food. This article describes the induced breeding of climbing perch and the interaction of scientists and farmers to improve survival of larvae and fry in through the use of live feeds (rotifer) in small-scale hatcheries in India.

Aspects of air-breathing fish farming practiced at Mathurapur-II Block, West Bengal, India

Climbing perch Anabas testudineus is a high-priced fish, nutritious and economically profitable for small- to medium-scale fish farmers, who can obtain fry from local paddy fields and low-lying inundated areas in late summer, monsoon and post-monsoon periods. Climbing perch is a facultative air-breathing fish that is able to move between water bodies by undertaking short migrations overland. This article describes techniques for climbing perch and major carp aquaculture, including use of biofloc systems, preparation of live feeds including mealworms, and some concerns regarding the hybridisation of native Indian strain of A. testudineus with an imported Vietnamese strain.

Expansion of host range of isopod Tachaea spongillicola infestation to fish species could pose a threat to aquaculture

Our article in the journal Aquaculture highlighted the first record of the isopod Tachaea spongillicola infesting wild fish species of aquaculture importance, particularly of carps. T. spongillicola was first recorded in freshwater sponges, 114 years ago and later recorded infesting freshwater prawns. Our recent study has further recorded infestation of this isopod in wild fish species. The expansion of host range from freshwater sponges to freshwater prawns and now to freshwater fish could pose a risk to aquatic industries in the years to come. We hypothesise that climate change could be a major factor contributing towards the expansion of the host range of parasites.

Exploration of canal resources as a potential source for fish production in the Indian Sundarbans

Fisheries is next to agriculture in offering employment opportunities for poor rural communities in Sundarbans. With around 17 million hectares of canals in India, there is considerable potential to generate jobs and improve the food security of rural populations if canals can be used for aquaculture production. This study explored the feasibility of aquaculture as a secondary use of canal infrastructure through use of net barrier partitions, installed and managed by local communities.