This report, the fifteenth in the series, contains information about the aquatic animal health status of fifteen states in the Asia-Pacific region.

The Asia-Pacific Grouper Network was initiated in 1998 at a meeting of grouper aquaculture researchers in Bangkok, Thailand, to promote effective regional cooperation among Asia-Pacific economies involved in grouper aquaculture research and development. This report has been prepared based on the recommendations of the NACA member governments to formalise the network within NACA as a regional network to support research and development in marine fish culture in the Asia-Pacific region.

These are the proceedings of a workshop hosted by APEC and NACA under the project 'Collaborative APEC-NACA Grouper Aquaculture Network' (APEC Project FWG 01/99). The objectives of the workshop included the establishment of a regional research network to facilitate development of a sustainable grouper aquaculture industry; reduction of reliance on wild fingerlings for coastal grouper aquaculture, facilitate development of new aquaculture industries.

These are the proceedings of a workshop focussed on grouper culture, but also explored management strategies required to support the sustainable development of seafarming in the Asian region. The emphasis was on technology transfer and management strategies for the benefit of farmers and coastal communities. The workshop included special sessions on diversification of seafarming systems and culture species, the role of seafarming in the livelihoods of coastal communities.

The Kathmandu symposium on coldwater fishes made recommendations covering three major themes: (1) distribution and conservation of coldwater fishes; (2) role of coldwater fishes in rural development and poverty alleviation; and (3) coldwater fisheries and aquaculture development. This report presents the  the recommendations of the three working groups. The symposium recommended regional cooperation among countries of the Trans-Himalayan region be strengthened for effective sharing and exchange of skills, experiences and technical cooperation.

This volume is the proceedings of the Symposium on Cold Water Fishes of the Trans-Himalayan Region, held in July 2001 in Kathmandu, Nepal. In 32 presentations it reviewed information, experiences, ideas and findings related to fish and fisheries in the region, including fish species distribution, fishing intensity, socio-economic conditions and livelihoods of fisher communities, as well as to the impact of environment degradation, conservation measures and aquaculture technologies for indigenous and exotic cold water fish.

In this issue:

Chemical residues. Live reef fish trade in Hong Kong. Barramundi farming in Australia. Freshwater pearl and prawn production in China. Status of common carp varieties under culture in China. Induced spawning of Pangasius sutchi. Cambodian farmers innovate cost-effective variations on Chinese hatcheries. Genes and fish. Improving rural livelihoods in Cambodia, Vietnam, Nepal and the Philippines through the STREAM Initiative. Marine finfish news, book reviews and more.

In this issue:

Governing Council 13 / AFBiS Seminar. US Consultation sets work agenda for the WB-NACA-WWF-FAO. Consortium on Shrimp Farming and the Environment. Conclusions and Recommendations of the Joint meeting of AFBiS 2002 and the 13th NACA Governing Council. FAO/NACA Expert Consultation Focusing on Aquaculture and Small-scale Aquatic Resource Management for Poverty Alleviation. Myanmar Fishery and Livestock Fair 2002 a huge success. Nepal develops national strategy on aquatic animal health management. Shrimp Farming & the Environment Case Studies now available on the web. NACA implements APEC project on Import Risk Analysis. MOU on project to prevent disease losses on prawn farms. Andhra Pradesh Fisheries Minister studies Thai & Malaysian aquaculture systems. Vietnamese mission evaluates new high value Chinese species.

This report, the forteenth in the series, contains information about the aquatic animal health status of thirteen states in the Asia-Pacific region.

STREAM is a regional initiative that will support capacity building among local government institutions, NGOs, and community groups involved in aquatic resources management. It will support community-based learning initiatives, develop a regional communications and learning strategy and support on-going policy and institutional changes in the region to enable aquatic resources users to participate more effectively in policy-making processes, and encouraging the development of more responsive government institutions.