In this issue:

Collection of tubifex worms from the Adi Ganga canal, West Bengal as means of livelihood; Some facts for the grow-out culture of an endangered catfish, Clarias magur; The cryptic domain of gut microbiota in composite culture of Indian major carps; Integrated rice-fish farming in hilly terraces of the Apatani Plateau, Arunachal Pradesh.

Although relatively slow growing, market demand for Clarias magur is sufficient to make it economically attractive for aquaculture. Supply of this species is through a combination of wild caught and cultured fish. However, a drastic reduction in wild populations has led to C. magur being listed as endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. Only limited quantities of cultured fish are available. The article communicates the aquaculture practices of C. magur including hatchery, nursery and grow out.

Live mud crab has a high export value and good overseas demand. Over the past fifteen years exports from India have increased, with the introduction of crab fattening practices. Wild-caught seed are held in pens constructed of bamboo screens for several weeks and fed to increase their body weight and hence value. Fattened crabs are onsold to traders exporters, who may air lift them to Singapore and other regional markets for the live restaurant trade.

The Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR) and NACA will convene the consultation from 26-27 February 2019. The consultation will be hosted by the ICAR National Bureau of Fish Genetic Resources (NBFGR) in Lucknow, India. The aim of the consultation is to find ways to assure genetic quality in seed production systems. Experts will discuss broodstock management and mechanisms to verify seed origin and quality. The goal is to empower farmers and monitoring agencies with provision of quantifiable standards.

The 9th Regional Training Course on Marine Finfish Seed production and Grow-out will be held from 19-30 November 2018 in Krabi, Thailand. The course will be taught by staff of the Krabi Coastal Fisheries Research and Development Centre. Drawing on expertise throughout the region, this three-week hands-on training course will provide participants with skills in marine finfish seed production and grow-out operations, with an emphasis on groupers and Asian seabass.

In this issue:

Concept of seed production of Heteropneustes fossilis in farmers' fields in West Bengal, India; Fishing gear and practices in flood waters of Assam; Fisherwomen empowerment: Shedding light on the invisible gender; Integrated multi-trophic aquaculture systems: A solution of sustainability.

The freshwater catfish Heteropneustes fossilis is a high-priced fish, well regarded in India for its nutritional and medicinal properties. The first successful induced breeding of this fish was in 1956 at Bangalore Central College (under the then Mysore University), although seed production was not standardised until 2000, at ICAR-CIFA, Bhubaneswar. This article describes broodstock maintenance, induced breeding techniques and the nursing of H. fossilis larvae in small ponds for sale in fish seed markets.

In the ornamental fish markets of India, the euryhaline spotted scat Scatophagus argus and pearlspot Etroplus suratensis are popularly sold as ornamental fish. This article describes the nursing of wild-caught spotted scat seed and in-pond breeding of pearlspot to produce marketable sized fish at the Joykrishna hatchery and fish seed farm, located in the Hooghly River estuarine zone in coastal West Bengal, India. The fish are reared in brackishwater ponds for commercial utilisation as ornamental fish, supplying Hyderabad and other cities.

In this issue:

Rearing of spotted scat and pearlspot in coastal West Bengal, India; harvesting Eurayle ferox (makhana) from wetland fisheries of Assam; prospects of ornamental fish culture in seasonal water bodies in Assam; production of tubifex, a new dimention in aquaculture in feeding juvenile fish; invasive apple snails in Brunei Darussalam; aquaculture trends and opportunities in Sindh, Pakistan; NACA Newsletter.

Some varieties of freshwater fish have low growth potential but remain economically attractive due to market preferences. The endangered catfish Horabagrus brachysoma is one such fish, which has limited production but high market demand, and a number of favourable biological characteristics. This article provides guidelines for the culture of this catfish in captivity including for the breeding, nursery, stocking and growout, including advice on pre- and post-stocking practices, harvesting and health management.