In this issue:

Mahseer sanctuaries of Meghalaya: A conservation and recreational perspective; Impacts of climate change on aquaculture in Vietnam: A review of local knowledge; Simple means of water aeration adopted by progressive fish breeders in West Bengal, India; Breeding striped snakehead (Channa striata) using the concrete tank method in the Cangkringan Area, Special Region of Yogyakarta; NACA Newsletter.

The striped snakehead (Channa striata) is a species of swamp fish that has a high economic value. Intensive fishing has reduced the wild populations. Hatchery production of this species has the potential for both commercial aquaculture supportive breeding programmes to conserve fish resources and increase the natural population. Below we describe a protocol we used for controlled spawning and hatchery operations for striped snakehead.

EHP or Enterocytozoon hepatopenaei is a fungal microsporidian parasite that infects the hepatopancreas (hp) of tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) and whiteleg shrimp (P. vannamei) in Thailand and results in slow growth and, in chronic infections, mortalities. EHP is also known from Brunei, China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Venezuela and Vietnam. This fact sheet provides information on the EHP life cycle, signs of infection, diagnosis and management in both hatcheries and growout, as well technical contacts for further information.

In this issue:

Cooperation with the Bangladesh Shrimp and Fish Foundation; Global Conference on Aquaculture 2020 update; Quarterly Aquatic Animal Disease Report, January-March 2019; A fresh look at inland fisheries and their role in food security and livelihoods; Tuskfish 2 Beta: Testers wanted; APAARI Regional Workshop on Underutilized Fish and Marine Genetic Resources and Their Amelioration; Joint Research Project on Utilization of Thailand Local Genetic Resources to Develop Novel Farmed Fish for Global Market; Impacts of climate change on fisheries and aquaculture.

Mud crab is one of the most valuable crustaeceans in both domestic and export markets. They are hardy and can survive out of water for extended periods at lower temperatures, making them idea for live export. Mud crab fattening predominates farming practices in Sundarban as opposed to grow-out culture. This report describes current practces adopted by mud crab farmers in India with special reference to the Indian Sundarban, where mud crab capture and farming are an important livelihood for small holder farmers.

In this issue:

Collection of tubifex worms from the Adi Ganga canal, West Bengal as means of livelihood; Some facts for the grow-out culture of an endangered catfish, Clarias magur; The cryptic domain of gut microbiota in composite culture of Indian major carps; Integrated rice-fish farming in hilly terraces of the Apatani Plateau, Arunachal Pradesh.

Although relatively slow growing, market demand for Clarias magur is sufficient to make it economically attractive for aquaculture. Supply of this species is through a combination of wild caught and cultured fish. However, a drastic reduction in wild populations has led to C. magur being listed as endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. Only limited quantities of cultured fish are available. The article communicates the aquaculture practices of C. magur including hatchery, nursery and grow out.

Live mud crab has a high export value and good overseas demand. Over the past fifteen years exports from India have increased, with the introduction of crab fattening practices. Wild-caught seed are held in pens constructed of bamboo screens for several weeks and fed to increase their body weight and hence value. Fattened crabs are onsold to traders exporters, who may air lift them to Singapore and other regional markets for the live restaurant trade.

The Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR) and NACA will convene the consultation from 26-27 February 2019. The consultation will be hosted by the ICAR National Bureau of Fish Genetic Resources (NBFGR) in Lucknow, India. The aim of the consultation is to find ways to assure genetic quality in seed production systems. Experts will discuss broodstock management and mechanisms to verify seed origin and quality. The goal is to empower farmers and monitoring agencies with provision of quantifiable standards.

The 9th Regional Training Course on Marine Finfish Seed production and Grow-out will be held from 19-30 November 2018 in Krabi, Thailand. The course will be taught by staff of the Krabi Coastal Fisheries Research and Development Centre. Drawing on expertise throughout the region, this three-week hands-on training course will provide participants with skills in marine finfish seed production and grow-out operations, with an emphasis on groupers and Asian seabass.