The Yellow Sea Fisheries Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Fisheries Sciences and NACA are organising a free online training course on mariculture technologies, to be held from 21-25 September 2020. The programme will cover breeding, disease control and prevention, nutrition and feed research, breeding model construction, farm technology development, engineering, quality, safety and inspection technology for aquatic products. The course is open to government officials, researchers, enterprise managers and technicians from developing countries. The deadline for applications is 19 September 2020.

In this issue:

Hatchery techniques for the seed production of short-necked clams (Paphia undulata) in Nha Trang, Vietnam; Lovesome chum of the aquarium are wreaking havoc in East Kolkata Wetlands, India; Concept of indigenous recirculatory aquaculture system executed in West Bengal, India and other places; Homestead modular hatchery technology of brackishwater catfish, Mystus gulio: A potential alternate livelihood option for small and marginal farmers of Sunderban; NACA Newsletter.

The catfish Mystus gulio is a small indigenous euryhaline fish found in fresh and brackishwater environments of the Sunderban delta of Bangladesh and India. A fast-growing species with high nutritional value, market demand and hardy nature, M. gulio is a desirable candidate for aquaculture in Asia. It is co-cultured with other brackishwater species in paddy fields, but expansion of culture in pond systems has been held back because of a shortage of seed. This article reports on induced breeding techniques and the development of a farmer-friendly modular hatchery and farming system suitable for use at the homestead level or by small-scale operators.

Aquaculture of short-necked clam Paphia undulata in Vietnam started approximately ten years ago, but production has been very small due to the lack of seed supply from hatcheries. The Institute of Aquaculture at Nha Trang University, is the first to conduct artificial seed production research on P. undulata and the first hatchery in Khanh Hoa province to produce seed of this species. This article describes techniques to induce spawning in P. undulata using wet and dry thermal shock stimuli. It also describes broodstock preparation, larval rearing, transportation techniques and the market value of this species.

In this issue:

Potential new species in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia: Sabaki tilapia (Oreochromis spilurus); Role of fish & fisheries in national nutrition of Pakistan; Success story of first fish farmer in India to be awarded ‘Padma Shri’; Insights into the fishing gear and ichthyofauna of major lentic water bodies of Kashmir Valley; NACA Newsletter.

In this issue:

Urgent warning: Positive PCR detection results for infectious myonecrosis virus (IMNV) and decapod iridescent virus 1 (DIV1) in captured Penaeus monodon from the Indian Ocean; COVID-19 news; Urgent announcement on usefulness of the lymphoid organ (LO) as an additional prime target for diagnosis of decapod iridescent virus 1 (DIV1) in diseased P. vannamei; Fresh or frozen seafood?; Report of the Eighteenth Meeting of the Asia Regional Advisory Group on Aquatic Animal Health; COVID-19 fallout could push half a billion people into poverty in developing countries; Simple techniques double crablet production.

Crab farmers will be happier, and the environment hopefully better, with recent improvements at the mangrove crab hatchery of SEAFDEC/AQD in Iloilo, Philippines. Crablets used in the farming of the prized mangrove crabs, Scylla serrata, are usually collected from the wild and increasing demand has threatened their natural population. However, Huervana recently revealed that simple tweaks in protocols at the SEAFDEC/AQD hatchery have led to a significant boost in their crablet production, with survival increasing twofold.

In this issue:

Mahseer sanctuaries of Meghalaya: A conservation and recreational perspective; Impacts of climate change on aquaculture in Vietnam: A review of local knowledge; Simple means of water aeration adopted by progressive fish breeders in West Bengal, India; Breeding striped snakehead (Channa striata) using the concrete tank method in the Cangkringan Area, Special Region of Yogyakarta; NACA Newsletter.

The striped snakehead (Channa striata) is a species of swamp fish that has a high economic value. Intensive fishing has reduced the wild populations. Hatchery production of this species has the potential for both commercial aquaculture supportive breeding programmes to conserve fish resources and increase the natural population. Below we describe a protocol we used for controlled spawning and hatchery operations for striped snakehead.

EHP or Enterocytozoon hepatopenaei is a fungal microsporidian parasite that infects the hepatopancreas (hp) of tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) and whiteleg shrimp (P. vannamei) in Thailand and results in slow growth and, in chronic infections, mortalities. EHP is also known from Brunei, China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Venezuela and Vietnam. This fact sheet provides information on the EHP life cycle, signs of infection, diagnosis and management in both hatcheries and growout, as well technical contacts for further information.