Join us on 31 May for a free webinar on Culture-based fisheries for rural development, with leading experts from the Asian region. Culture-based fisheries (CBF) are practices to enhance fish stocks in waters that don't have enough natural recruitment to sustain a fishery. CBF practices are usually applied in small water bodies such as village dams and irrigation reservoirs. Fish growth is driven by the natural productivity of the waters, foraging on natural food supplies. The simplicity and low capital requirements of CBF make it easy for farming communities to learn and adopt.

In this issue:

Exotic trout fisheries resources and potentialities in Uttarakhand; Scenario of captive production of Clarias magur in India; Strategies to reduce feed cost by improving gut health and nutrient utilisation of fish in aquaculture; Fish pituitary gland collection and supply as a vocation in West Bengal, India; Coral trout Plectropomus leopardus aquaculture research and fingerling production in Indonesia; Smartphone app improving smallholder shrimp farming practices in Bangladesh; NACA Newsletter.

Commercial trout farming in Uttarakhand has advanced progressively during the last decade and has become a profitable occupation among the rural masses especially in the colder regimes where no other fish farming has possibilities. The rainbow trout here plays the most dominant role as a commercially important candidate species for culture in this hill locked Himalayan state of India. This article describes the current status of trout fisheries resources and trout aquaculture in Uttarakhand, and their potential further development.

In this issue:

Farming of Asian seabass Lates calcarifer in freshwater impoundments in West Bengal, India; An integrated approach to contemporary fish farming practice incorporating traditional knowledge in mid hills in India: A success story; Mud crab farming: An alternative livelihood in the Indian Sundarban; Trout fisheries resources and potentialities in the Menchukha region of Arunachal Pradesh; NACA Newsletter.

The success of any aquaculture project or fish farm depends to a large extent on selection of a suitable site. Site selection using the conventional method, based on very limited data, can result in inaccurate information and cause discrepancies among the implementing agencies. The utilisation of remote sensing and geographic information systems can provide a useful source of additional information. This article provides a GIS-based analysis of the suitability of sites for trout farming and the establishment of sport fisheries in the Menchukha valley, Arunachal Pradesh.

An Expert Consultation on Invasive Alien Fish Species: Need for a Risk Benefit Assessment and Management Framework for Healthy Freshwater Systems will be organised on 19 December 2018 in New Delhi, India. The consultation will flag the need for an equilibrium between access to non-native germplasm and the minimisation of risk to ecosystems and native fish diversity from such introductions. As a major outcome, an objective tool is expected to be developed, which can be used to evaluate prospective introductions and support decision making.

Mahseer are the most popular game fish amongst anglers in India, with a reputation as one of the toughest fighters amongst freshwater sports fish. In this article, we have made an attempt to compile information on recreational mahseer fisheries in India. The importance of the mighty mahseer as a game fish is told through the perspectives of active anglers and the visions of stakeholders and researchers in conservation and ecotourism are presented.

The potential for augmentation of fish production and fish-based eco-tourism in Arunachal Pradesh are immense. The landscape of the state is characterised by lofty mountains with snow-clad peaks, dense forests, turbulent streams and a rich diversity of flora and fauna. We review the potential of some of the lakes in the region to support trout fisheries for both recreational fishing and eco-tourism, with a view to providing job opportunities for highland communities.

In this issue:

Inspiring story of aquaculture in Sikkim - a journey from conservation to farming; farming of scampi and tiger shrimp together - a case study from West Bengal; Labeo pangusia - a candidate for diversification of hill aquaculture; sustainability of an integrated livestock-fish-crop farming system as a small scale enterprise; sustainable coastal aquaculture in India; potential scope and prospects of domestic fish market in Chhattisgarh.

Sikkim is a small Himalayan state of India with three climatic zones ranging from tropical to temperate to alpine. The moderate-cool and warm agro-climatic zones are suitable for farming rainbow trout and exotic carp species, while brown trout hatchery and ranching can be conducted in the alpine areas. We report on the status of exotic carp and trout farming in Sikkim including farming practices, constraints faced by local farmers and possible solutions.