In this issue:

Farming of Asian seabass Lates calcarifer in freshwater impoundments in West Bengal, India; An integrated approach to contemporary fish farming practice incorporating traditional knowledge in mid hills in India: A success story; Mud crab farming: An alternative livelihood in the Indian Sundarban; Trout fisheries resources and potentialities in the Menchukha region of Arunachal Pradesh; NACA Newsletter.

The success of any aquaculture project or fish farm depends to a large extent on selection of a suitable site. Site selection using the conventional method, based on very limited data, can result in inaccurate information and cause discrepancies among the implementing agencies. The utilisation of remote sensing and geographic information systems can provide a useful source of additional information. This article provides a GIS-based analysis of the suitability of sites for trout farming and the establishment of sport fisheries in the Menchukha valley, Arunachal Pradesh.

An Expert Consultation on Invasive Alien Fish Species: Need for a Risk Benefit Assessment and Management Framework for Healthy Freshwater Systems will be organised on 19 December 2018 in New Delhi, India. The consultation will flag the need for an equilibrium between access to non-native germplasm and the minimisation of risk to ecosystems and native fish diversity from such introductions. As a major outcome, an objective tool is expected to be developed, which can be used to evaluate prospective introductions and support decision making.

Mahseer are the most popular game fish amongst anglers in India, with a reputation as one of the toughest fighters amongst freshwater sports fish. In this article, we have made an attempt to compile information on recreational mahseer fisheries in India. The importance of the mighty mahseer as a game fish is told through the perspectives of active anglers and the visions of stakeholders and researchers in conservation and ecotourism are presented.

The potential for augmentation of fish production and fish-based eco-tourism in Arunachal Pradesh are immense. The landscape of the state is characterised by lofty mountains with snow-clad peaks, dense forests, turbulent streams and a rich diversity of flora and fauna. We review the potential of some of the lakes in the region to support trout fisheries for both recreational fishing and eco-tourism, with a view to providing job opportunities for highland communities.

In this issue:

Inspiring story of aquaculture in Sikkim - a journey from conservation to farming; farming of scampi and tiger shrimp together - a case study from West Bengal; Labeo pangusia - a candidate for diversification of hill aquaculture; sustainability of an integrated livestock-fish-crop farming system as a small scale enterprise; sustainable coastal aquaculture in India; potential scope and prospects of domestic fish market in Chhattisgarh.

Sikkim is a small Himalayan state of India with three climatic zones ranging from tropical to temperate to alpine. The moderate-cool and warm agro-climatic zones are suitable for farming rainbow trout and exotic carp species, while brown trout hatchery and ranching can be conducted in the alpine areas. We report on the status of exotic carp and trout farming in Sikkim including farming practices, constraints faced by local farmers and possible solutions.

The fourth major international event on giant freshwater prawns was organised by the Asian Institute of Technology from 20-24 March 2007. The conference, organised by Salin Krishna and Michael New, built on a series of highly successful events that trace back to the very beginnings of the industry. The first conference, Giant Prawn 1980 brought together all those involved in freshwater prawn research and farming for the first time and set many priorities for future research and development.

In recent years, stocking programs have been subjected to substantial criticism due to perceived impact of hatchery-bred fish on genetic structure and fitness of wild stocks, transfer of disease, introduction of exotic species and non-target species, and their effects on other aquatic species and the environment. To maximise the potential benefits to fisheries from stock enhancement a responsible and ecologically sustainable approach should be adopted for all stocking programs.

In this issue:

Aquaculture in Hubei Province, central China. Ornamental fish farming - a successful cottage industry in rural and urban India. Measuring empowerment of women through self-help groups in aquaculture. Pigeon pea Cajanus cajan cultivation over fish pond dykes - an economically viable farming approach. Culture of freshwater climbing perch Anabas testudineus. Augmentation of fish production from a small reservoir of Vidarbha: A success story. Emergency consultation on early mortality syndrome of shrimp.