The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of the international seafood trade and poverty, with special reference to the trade in some selected marine products between Asia and the European Union. It represents Output 1 of the project “The International Seafood Trade: supporting sustainable livelihoods among poor aquatic resource users in Asia”, which was funded by the European Community's Poverty Reduction Effectiveness Programme (EC-PREP).

This article compares the use of chemical and biological amendments in shrimp farming in Asia and the Americas. The information comes mainly from the author’s experience in Thailand and Ecuador, as well as from the literature. The amendments are discussed according to three major categories: (1) water and soil quality management products, (2) biocides, and (3) feed additives. Certain agents, while necessary to successful shrimp farming, should be used only when needed and in a safe and responsible manner. 

This report presents a précis of the regulatory procedures for authorisation of veterinary medicines in Europe and the USA. In particular it concentrates upon the requirements for consumer safety in regard to presence of residues of veterinary medicines in the edible tissues of food animal species. In both Europe and the USA the regulations in regard to veterinary residues and consumer safety require that countries wishing to export into those markets demonstrate equivalent standards to the domestic requirements.

This document was the result of the discussions, conclusions and recommendations reached during the Expert Consultation in consultation held in Bhubaneswar, India, 16-19 October 2001. It was based on country reviews (Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Myanmar, Pakistan, Nepal, and Sri Lanka), a synthesis paper (India), a technical guideline paper (Chinese experience) and resource expert papers (diseases and health management, water use and environment, nutrition and feeding) made available or presented during the Expert Consultation.

An Emergency Disease Control Task Force on a Serious Disease of Koi and Common Carps in Indonesia was organised by NACA in June 2002. The Task Force conducted an emergency assessment of the disease situation in July through field and laboratory examinations of collected samples. The Task Force collected information about the disease occurrence. Koi herpes virus was detected from all case samples which indicates that it may have played a role in the observed mortalities.

The aim of this report is to provide brief profiles of the main stakeholders within the aquatic resources and fisheries sectors in Western Visayas, to describe their access to information, and the communication between and within stakeholder groups, organisations and institutions within the sector. The report goes on to identify current needs and key action points which might maximise efficient communication.

This is the report of the “BFAR/NACA-STREAM/FAO Workshop on Livelihoods Approaches and Analysis” held in Iloilo City, Philippines from 24-28 November 2003. The main purpose of the workshop was to develop and document mechanisms for training in livelihoods approaches and analysis, and to build national capacity to conduct livelihoods analysis. The workshop in Iloilo was the first in a series which will take place in other countries in the region.

Wild-harvest fisheries for live reef fish are largely over-exploited or unsustainable. Sustainable aquaculture – such as that of groupers – is one option for meeting increasing demand for reef fish as well as potentially maintaining livelihoods of coastal communities. This report draws upon secondary literature, media sources and four diverse case studies from at-risk reef fisheries, to frame a strategy for encouraging sustainable aquaculture as an alternative to destructive fishing practices. It was commissioned by the APEC Secretariat.

The Second SPARK-STREAM Workshop on Livelihoods and Languages took place in Tagaytay City, Philippines, from 12-14 June 2003. The outputs of the workshop included drafts of a language-specific “Guide to Learning and Communicating about Livelihoods”, drafts of articles for STREAM Journal and SPARK Newsletter, identification of priorities and practical follow-up for capacity-building in carrying out participatory livelihoods analysis and the development of follow-up plans.

The purpose of this workshop was to build shared understandings of participatory livelihoods concepts and approaches, with emphases on the approaches as ways of thinking and working, and on learning from concrete examples from the experiences of STREAM in Cambodia and Vietnam, and SPARK in the Philippines. One outcome from the first workshop, was that between the two workshops participants would carry out follow-up tasks appropriate to their context.