In this issue:

  • Mahseer in recreational fisheries and ecotourism in India.
    Deepjyoti Baruah and Debajit Sarma
  • Small-scale aquaculture of wild fish in Myanmar: A preliminary report from the Bago Region.
    Soe Min Oo and Kenneth T. Mackay
  • Current know how and possibility for growout culture of an endangered catfish, Horabagrus brachysoma.
    S.K. Sahoo, S. Ferosekhan and S.S. Giri
  • Accelerated poverty alleviation of tribal households - cage fish farming by displaced fishers in reservoirs of Jharkhand.
    Rajiw Kumar, I.A.S.
  • Adaptive learning in sustainable aquaculture: Best practices for small-scale shrimp farmers in Thailand.
    NACA
  • NACA Newsletter.

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Aquaculture Asia Magazine

Aquaculture Asia Magazine is an autonomous publication that gives farmers and scientists in developing countries a voice. Stories concern the small-scale aquaculture prevalent in the region and the circumstances of farmers trying to make ends meet in an increasingly globalised world. We accept articles on any aspect of aquaculture and the related processing, marketing, economic, environmental and social issues. An RSS feed is available if you wish to stay informed of new issues.

In this collection

Adaptive learning in sustainable shrimp aquaculture: Best practices for small-scale shrimp farmers in Thailand

Early mortality syndrome of the type more accurately known as Acute Hepatopancreatic Necrosis Disease is causing major losses in marine shrimp in a number of Asian countries. The disease is associated with infection by a strain of the bacteria Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Here we describe a project to reduce the incidence of disease and improve crop outcomes for small-scale farmers in Thailand via an adaptive learning approach, implemented in association with farmer societies and collectives.

Small-scale aquaculture of wild fish in Myanmar: A preliminary report from the Bago Region

Myanmar aquaculture has previously been considered to be medium to large scale with little to no small-scale aquaculture. Here we report on an indigenous small-scale aquaculture system in Myanmar based on natural monsoon stocking of rice fields with wild fish, which are subsequently trapped, fed and grown out, with a portion used as broodstock to supplement the next years production. The practice is widespread and interviews with farmers suggest that it has been in place for at least 40 years.

Mahseer in recreational fisheries and ecotourism in India

Mahseer are the most popular game fish amongst anglers in India, with a reputation as one of the toughest fighters amongst freshwater sports fish. In this article, we have made an attempt to compile information on recreational mahseer fisheries in India. The importance of the mighty mahseer as a game fish is told through the perspectives of active anglers and the visions of stakeholders and researchers in conservation and ecotourism are presented.

Accelerated poverty alleviation of tribal households: Cage fish farming by displaced fishers in reservoirs of Jharkhand

Jharkhand, India, has a significant population of tribal people, around 28% of the state's 33 million. Agriculture is the main livelihood and subsistence-level farming is predominant, offering limited opportunities for employment to landless people for most of the year. This article documents the experience of the Jharkhand Department of Fisheries in developing cage-based aquaculture as an alternative livelihood for tribal fishers that had been displaced by the construction of reservoirs, working in association with fisher collectives.

Current know-how and possibility for growout culture of an endangered catfish, Horabagrus brachysoma

Some varieties of freshwater fish have low growth potential but remain economically attractive due to market preferences. The endangered catfish Horabagrus brachysoma is one such fish, which has limited production but high market demand, and a number of favourable biological characteristics. This article provides guidelines for the culture of this catfish in captivity including for the breeding, nursery, stocking and growout, including advice on pre- and post-stocking practices, harvesting and health management.

We need an aquaculture internet of things

We are at the beginning of a new revolution, the Internet of Things (IOT): Smart networked devices and sensors that collect information about their surroundings, communicate with people and machines, make decisions based on programming models and interact with the physical world through control of switches, motors and actuators. Many of these devices are low-cost, literally a few dollars and they are getting cheaper all the time. The IOT offers new opportunities for the aquaculture industry to improve on-farm efficiency.