• Editorial: Tilapia lake virus (TiLV).
    Simon Wilkinson
  • Inspiring story of aquaculture in Sikkim: A journey from conservation to farming.
    Prakash Sharma and Riteshkumar S. Tandel.
  • Farming of scampi and tiger shrimp together: A case study from West Bengal, India.
    Subrato Ghosh and Himadri Chandra
  • Labeo pangusia: A potential candidate species for diversification of hill aquaculture.
    Debajit Sarma, Atul Borgohain, Kusubh Bhagawati and A.K. Singh
  • Sustainability of an integrated livestock-fish-crop farming system as a small scale enterprise.
    Bibha Chetia Borah and Sonmoina Bhuyan
  • Sustainable coastal aquaculture in India.
    R. Jayaraman
  • Potential scope and prospects of domestic fish market in Kawardha District, Chhattisgarh, India.
    B. Nightingale Devi, H.K. Varida and Anirudh Kumar

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Aquaculture Asia Magazine

Aquaculture Asia Magazine is an autonomous publication that gives farmers and scientists in developing countries a voice. Stories concern the small-scale aquaculture prevalent in the region and the circumstances of farmers trying to make ends meet in an increasingly globalised world. We accept articles on any aspect of aquaculture and the related processing, marketing, economic, environmental and social issues. An RSS feed is available if you wish to stay informed of new issues.

In this collection

Editorial: Tilapia lake virus (TiLV)

Tilapia lake virus (TiLV) is a relatively recent pathogen causing serious mortalities in farmed tilapia. The virus appears to be spreading via the usual pathway of importation of live fish with inadequate regard for biosecurity protocols. Countries that are at risk should establish surveillance for TiLV. Unusual tilapia mortalities should be investigated. Importation of live tilapia should probably be reconsidered until adequate biosecurity arrangements are in place. Links to some recent advisories and publications are provided.

Inspiring story of aquaculture in Sikkim: A journey from conservation to farming

Sikkim is a small Himalayan state of India with three climatic zones ranging from tropical to temperate to alpine. The moderate-cool and warm agro-climatic zones are suitable for farming rainbow trout and exotic carp species, while brown trout hatchery and ranching can be conducted in the alpine areas. We report on the status of exotic carp and trout farming in Sikkim including farming practices, constraints faced by local farmers and possible solutions.

Farming of scampi and tiger shrimp together: A case study from West Bengal, India

We report on an Indian farmer co-culturing tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon and the giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii. The farm utilises wild-caught riverine seed, stocked at a relatively low density and fed on a Macrobrachium pellet which P. monodon also accepts.

Labeo pangusia: A potential candidate species for diversification of hill aquaculture

Labeo pangusia is a highly prized hill stream carp found mainly in the deeper pools of upland streams. Heavy fishing pressure has led to depletion of wild populations in recent years and the species is likely to become threatened if a conservation strategy is not developed. We report on an investigation into the reproductive biology of this species and on the result of successful induced breeding trials.

Sustainability of an integrated livestock-fish-crop farming system as a small-scale enterprise

We examined the sustainability and economic viability of a model integrated livestock-fish-crop farming system developed by the Fisheries Research Centre, Assam Agricultural University, over an extended period of 13 years. The system was developed as an ecologically sustainable alternative technology for small and margin farmers. It incorporates two livestock components, pig and poultry, with horticulture and carp polyculture. Analysis of cash flow and benefit-cost ration revealed the system to be economically sustainable over the long term.

Sustainable coastal aquaculture in India

Coastal aquaculture in India was historically focussed mainly on tiger shrimp farming (Penaeus monodon) but production issues and disease led to the introduction of SPF Pacific white shrimp (L. vannamei) in 2009. A robust technical and legal framework was established by the Coastal Aquaculture Authority. Improved regulation has improved sustainability of the sector and underpinned production, with farmed Pacific shrimp output rising from 1,731 tonnes in 2009-2010 to 353,413 tonnes in 2014-2015.

Potential scope and prospects of domestic fish market in Kawardha District, Chhattisgarh, India

Trade in fisheries products is an important source of livelihoods for economically underprivileged people in Chhattisgarh. A socio-economic profile of traders and other actors from a domestic fish market is presented, including age, gender, education and income levels. The market infrastructure, distribution channels and species traded are described. Constraints to marketing arrangements are identified and include a lack of cold chain, storage and transport facilities.